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imes 







CoHeae 
378.7691 
B487c 
1944 









Hutchins Library 

of 

Berea College 




Berea, Kentucky 





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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/chimes194400bere 



"we cherish the old and the new" 



Jacob's Ladder 



• • • 



AnchorsAweigh 



•• 



Berea Beloved 



• • 



ii i inr ^ nft ' iii 1 -. ■ -*n. » i ' -;^ fn ; 




the '44 Chimes 



published at Berea College 



Bereo, Kentucky 



Professor Rigby taught Berea to love her music; he gave 
Berea music to love. 



// 



While we were growing from the two-room "music hall" 
to spacious Presser, Professor Rigby led us in simple 
mountain songs and he taught us the glory of standing 
to sing the Hallelujah Chorus; 




First Music Hall 



Presser Hal 




Cortege 378.7691 B487c 1944 

Berea College Collegiate dept Senior 

class 

Chimes 



To him 

we dedicate our book 





our president, Francis S. Hut-chins, with Didi and Ann 



i h • "■> m t.-. i i ~. r , 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Bruce Barton 
Allan Knight Chalmers 
Thomas P. Cooper 
Chase Kimball 
William D. Embree 
Louis J. Karnosh 
C. N. Manning 
James Lyall Stuart- 
Albert Buckner Coe 
William H. Danforth 
William A. Julian 
Thomas J. Davis 



Allen E. Foster 
Carl T. Michel 
Edward W. Edwards 
W. T. Holliday 
Seth Low Pierrepont 
Charles Ward Seabury 
W. D. Weatherford 
Richard Bentley 
Barry Bingham 
Elmer E. Cabbard 
Leslie Clenn 
Gale F. Johnson 



THE CABINET 




President Hutchins, Dean Weidler, Dean Shutt, Dean Baker, Dean Baird, Dean Allen, Dean True, 
Dean Wright, Miss Gundlach. 




From the College Hospital 

Dr. John W. Armstrong 
Dr. Ruby Helen Paine 



Dean of Foundation School 
William Jesse Baird 



Heads of physical education de- 
partments 

Minnie Maude Macaulay 
Oscar H. Gunkler 



Director of art department 
Mary Ela 



Professor of geology 

Wilbur G. Burroughs 

From the business department 

William Newbolt 
and Clarence Dawson 



pedagogues all, in Louis Smith's terminology, teaching with bur 
sen burners and slides in Science Hall 



Elisabeth Peck 

teacher of social studies 

Dorothy M. Harvey 

teacher of French and psy- 
chology 

Deans of Women 

Julia F. Allen, U. D. 
Katharine True, L. D. 



Dean of Lower Division 
Charles N. Shutt 



Dean of Upper Division and 
phychology professor 

Lawrence M. Baker 



Chemistry professors 

Henry Refo 
Julian H. Capps 

Orrin Keener 

teacher of social studies 

Frank Smith 

of the sociology department 




. . . officed near the sleek corridors of Draper Building and 
the quiet of Danforth Chapel or in the rickety Liberal 




English profs 

Ernest J. Weekes 
Earl W. Blank 

Science Hall men 

John Loefer, biology and 
chemistry 

Herschel Hull, biology 
and John Bangson, biology 

Harriet Howard 

who teaches weaving 

with Charlotte Ludlum 

who teaches ancient lang- 
uages 



Albert Chidester 

teacher of education 
with Ralph Rigby 

of the music department 

More English profs 

Hattie Stowe 
Emma Reeverts 
May B. Smith 

Gilbert Roberts 

math professor 

and H. D. Schultz 

industrial arts prof 



Arts Building where PAF discussions rage furiously . . . 
studying psychology on the third floor of Lincoln Hall with 




Education professor 
Luther Ambrose 

Pre-school teacher 

Jacqueline Sparling 

and Betty Ferris 

music teacher 

Ag. profs 

Howard B. Monier 
Benton Fielder 



From Presser Hall 

Gertrude Cheney 

and English prof 

Maureen Faulkner 

Library science 

Virginia Engle 
and Albert G. Weidler 
economics prof 

and more Ag profs 

Charles Price 
Wilmot Carter 
Claude Spillman 



Greek mottoes and the old Alpha Zeta curtains stuffed 
Dehind the radiators . . . Ag Building with its butchering 




Rector Herdin, 

economics prof 

and Louis Smith, 

political science pedagogue 

More home economics profs 

Marian Kingman 
Alice Reid 
Agnes Aspnes 

Henry Gardner 

math teacher 

with Dallas H. Candy 
psychology prof 

and Theodore Wright 
math teacher 



Eunice True 

home economics teacher 

with Margaret Chapin 
who teaches French 

and Ruth Woods 

home economics teacher 

Of the math department 

Donald Pugsley 
W. R. Hutcherson 
Mrs. Clara Rice 

Ag teachers 

Feaster Wolford 
and F. A. Stewart 



labs and judging in the pavilion . . . enjoying the real 
home atmosphere of Emery ... studying posture silhouettes 




History and political science profs 

Lee F. Crippen 
and E. Taylor Parks 

From the physics department 

Waldemar Noll 
and Herbert Fenn 

More music teachers 

Dorothy Hall 
Gladys Jameson 
Celia Kysela 



Minnie Led ford 

English teacher 

Elizabeth Richardson 

French and Spanish 

Philosophy profs 

J. Clayton Feaver 
and W. Gordon Ross 

with J. Robert King, Jr. 
music teacher 

Sociology profs 

J. W. Hatcher 

Helen Dingman 
with Walter Sikes, 

teacher of philosophy and 

Bible 



in Miss Macaulay's office . . . listening to the shouts and 
splashes from the pool at Seabury . . . the sound of scales on 




English profs 

Jerome Hughes 
Emily Ann Smith 

with Coach Clarence Wyatt 
of the men's phy ed dept 

Art department profs 

Harriett Gill 
Margaret Balzer 



Women's phy ed teacher 
Smythie Alford 

with Lenore Lytle 

math teacher 
and Esther Beck 

of the business department 

German professor 

Charles Pauck 
with English and speech teacher 

John W. Sattler 



pianos and horns from the windows of Presser . . . colors and tex- 
tures in the Art Building personalities of the faculty 

and their haunts where we are privileged to learn. 






So this is what we've been waiting for' 




is freshmen we thought a senior had one foot in the grave— as 
seniors we don't feel a day older 





Lenore Grouser 

Mannington, W. Va. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Vivian Lee Buckles 

Coalgood, Ky. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 



Theodore Caddell 

Holly Hill, Ky. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 

Esther Orth 

New York, N.Y. 

A.B., Biology 



Dorothy Alice Chandler 

Greeneville, Tenn. 
A.B., Home Economics 

Virginia L. Osborne 

Candler, N.C. 
A.B., Art and English 



chins up, seniors, these are the best days, when loafing cc 
come at midday; when time is punched just fifteen hou 
a week and the news is our news in the Wallpap 



iw heck, first period class! We'd rather knit for someone 
'e like or paint the sunlight in her hair . . models 

re good subjects to weave into compositions 



Mary Hazel Hatchette 

Spartanburg, S.C. 

A.B., English 

Imogene Mae Fitzpatrick 

Hazard, Ky. 

A.B., Economics 



Nancy Field 

Winchester, Ky. 

A.B., Art 

Nell Elizabeth Warholm 

Grundy, Va. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 



Ella Florence Edwards 

Bel Air, Md. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Jean Crouser 

Mannington, W.Va. 

B.S., Home Economics 




«f' : 




Nancy Barnett 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 

Marie Watkins 

Asheville, N.C. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 



John Denham 

Hazard, Ky. 

A.B., Chemistry 

Margaret Geissinger Noss 

Stroudsburg, Pa. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Edmonia Ella Clark 

Hammond, Ky. 

A.B., Home Economics 

Annabel Brake 
Petersburg, W.Va. 
A.B., Mathematics 



fun in going for library mail, more fun in Sunday leisure; bu 
there's science in calculating what a well-dressed woman wi 
wea^ and how to keep the Chimes out of the red . . 



low that the test is over, why not head for home and look up the 
answers (wish we'd done it before) . . . besides there may 
>e a letter waiting for someone who is demure 



Maryanna Shupe 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., Home Economics 

Olga Beck 

Baughman, Ky. 

A.B., Biology 



Clarence Hayes Steinberger 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., Philosophy 

Sarah Lee O'Daniel 

Belmont, N.C. 

A.B., Education 



Billie Marie Nestor 

Marmet, W.Va. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 

Katherine Carson 
Weaverville, N.C. 
A.B., Mathematics 





Frieda Begley Wilson 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., English 

Lenore Lee Whitman 
Logan, W. Va. 
A.B., Sociology 



June Rosebud Morton 

South Shore, Ky. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 

Clyde C. Flannery 

Dunham, Ky. 

A.B., Philosophy and 

Psychology 



Benjamin H. Davis 

Bar Creek, Ky. 

A.B., Geology 

Eva Nell Whitaker 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

A.B., English 



pretty plain about them . . . Heart on her sleeve ... to calm for Else 
Maxwell . . . "Good morning, College Hospital" . . . "One 
announcement please" . . . Evil's picture for the Chimes . . 



whatever will the college do without us . . . wonder who'll milk 
the cows . . . burn the lights at Emery . . . instruct in the lab . . . 
run the switchboard . . . play the chimes other seniors? 



John Hubbard 

Nora, Ky. 

B.S., Agriculture 

Betty Jo Knotts 

Camden, N.J. 

A.B., Chemistry 



Dorothy Trumbo 

Tollesboro, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Edsel Burton 

Monticello, Ky. 

A.B., Biology 



Loree Sinclaire 
Spindale, N.C. 
A.B., English 

Frances Henderson 

Mt. Vernon, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 





Alice Fox 

Crossville, Tenn. 

A.B., Home Economics 

Edith Campbell 

Pineville, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Mary Lou Muncy 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., Education 

Hazel Foley 

Russell Springs, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Nora Lou Thomson 
Louisville, Ky. 
A.B., English 

Ernestine Edwards 

Spartanburg, S.C. 

A.B., English 



just foxing - he belongs to Country Home . . . thoroughly 
stamped we emerge in long black robes that hang the same 
on transfers, town students, and James Hall protegee's . . . 



ten years from now when you're coming in for homecom- 
ing and the conductor calls "Bur-ear-er", you'll swear to your 
traveling partner that you never cracked a book 



Ruth Peaslee 
Oak Park, III. 
A.B., English 

Katherine Keen 

Helenwood, Tenn. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Ida Elder 

Griffin, La. 

A.B., Home Economics 

Luella Thomas 

Newport, Ky. 

A.B., Psychology 



Lillian Altizer 

Riner, Va. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 

Madge Freeman 

Lewisburg, W.Va. 

A.B., English 





Ruby Lee Smith 

Disputanta, Ky. 

A.B., Home Economics 

Lurine Booher 

Monroe, Tenn. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Margaret Nickels 

Benham, Ky. 
A.B., Psychology 

Elizabeth Douglass 

Athens, Tenn. 

A.B., Music 



Letta Walters 
Pumpkin Chapel, Ky. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Thomas Hubbard 

Fort Gay, W.Va. 

A.B., Physics 



reading, playing basketball, or listening to a nickel's worth of 
"Pistol Packin' Mama" is relaxation after a man's job at 
the creamery or a long day in the physics lab . . I 



Dmazed by the galaxy of color . . . blue without you, brown bacilli, 
Dink elephants ... in the red— reserve book due 
3ut at least we have the mechanical advantage 



Helen Bell 

Asheville, N.C. 

A.B., English 

Marie Home 

Coeburn, Va. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Evelyn Brown 

Cain's Store, Ky. 

A.B., Biology 

Grace Hollyfield 

Pound, Va. 

A.B., English 



Evelyn Barr 

Blounrville, Tenn. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Dewey Moore 
Fallsburg, Ky. 
A.B., Physics 





Verna Brady 

Copenhagen, N.Y. 

A.B., Sociology 

Eldred Pennington 

Fielden, Ky. 

A.B., Education 



Evelyn Powell 

Brevard, N.C. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Cam Wyatt 

Piney Creek, N.C. 

B.S., Agriculture 



Elizabeth Kuykendall 

Asheville, N.C. 

A.B., English 

Jean Dodson Stewart 

Monticello, Ky. 
A.B., Home Economics 



sure, the class has shrunk some, but why gripe 

we get around to hiking, visiting, studying, and working with 

every member now ... we know each other— and that's good . . . 



vvhat are we good for when this part of that life-long education 
spoken of in chapel is done. .. perhaps the same thing we were 
^ood for in MO, only more so ... we have chosen our future 



Polly Keen 

Dryhill, Ky. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Ann Armfield 

Tampa, Fla. 

A.B., Phychology 



Paul Fletcher 
Deskins, Va. 
A.B., Physics 

Margaret Atchley 

Lenoir City, Tenn. 

B.S., Home Economics 



Ann Lankford 

Shenandoah, Va. 

A.B., English 

Eloise Loftis 

Campobello, S.C. 

A.B., Home Economics 




MHMI^H 




Dorothy Goforth 

Asheville, N.C. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Bill Steinberger 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., Physics 



Earl Hays 

Berea, Ky. 

A.B., Biology 

Wilma Wilson 

Berea, Ky. 
A.B., English 



Agnes Anders 

Barnardsville, N.C. 

B.S., Home Economics 

Bertha Bell 

Liberty, Ky. 

A.B., History and Political 

Science 



caught at leisure having put away their work to cater 
to the photographer . . . after a hard fight we're 
nearing the end of the fight toward graduation . . 



Dick it up, girls . . . this is your last year to drop 
jne, catch one, or dress one up for the production 
vhy, they'll tell their grandchildren's children 



Mary Elizabeth Coates 

Banco, Va. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Ellen Hillman 
Almyro, Ark. 
A.B., English 



Marjorie Gilliam 
Fountain City, Tenn. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Mary Butler 
Wellford, S.C. 
A.B., English 



Alta Mae Davis Reber 

Middlesboro, Ky. 
B.S., Home Economics 

Elwood Reber 

Westlawn, Pa. 

A.B., Chemistry 





NURSES 



Evadna Blackburn 

Berea, Ky. 
A.B., Psychology 

Benjamin Washburn 

Bostic, N.C. 

B.S., Agriculture 





Alice Witt 
Ludlow, Ky. 



Margaret Jones 
Friendsville, Tenn. 



Eunice Fosson 
Ashland, Ky. 



Laura Belle Childers 
Gallup, Ky. 



;he painted your throat in the service room, pushed a ther- 
nometer at you at five in the morning., brought that gorgeous 
ray of— milk toast . . . and now she's graduating with us . 



Betty Parades 
Milford, Mich. 

Beulah Serser 
Loyall, Ky. 



June Anderson 
Wendover, Ky. 

Judith Miller 
Easley, S. C. 



Obera Huddlesron 
Benham, Ky. 

Genevieve Manteufel 
Cleveland, Ohio 





Martha Ferguson 
Grassy Creek, Ky. 

Wanda Lee Francis 
Yellow Rock, Ky. 



Ellelia Stallard 
Herald, Va. 

Lucille Turner 
Hazard, Ky. 



Jeraldine Skidmore 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

Virgie Wright 
Hulin, Ky. 



when you were in the annex with that splotchy, broken - 01 
condition she kept you from dying of self-pity by trea- 
ing you just like any other patient with the measles . . 



. 




SECOND YEAR . . . 

Rachel Frady. Emma McCann, Ruth Collins, Bertha Inman, Eileen 
Stafford, Emma Woodard, Tenna Hill, Ruth Crawford 

FIRST YEAR . . . 

Alberta Fleck, Dorothy Russell, Frances Digby, Sarah Harr, Rachel 
Chaffin, Fanny Martin, Mary Sue Hillman, Lois Covington, Elsie Zofer 
Mary Ruth Mills, Etta Fritz, Elsie Coffey, Merle Matheson, Mary Phillips! 
Alice Kempf 

imember the red-cheeked probie who made you ^ 
imp up and down on that silly little foot-stool dur- 
ig physicals ... her first contact with our heart. 





Margaret Callison, Treas., Norma Vanderheide, Marguerite Imrie, Co- 
Chair. Social Comm.; Yvonne Covilli, Sec; Helen Monson, Vice-Pres.; 
Winifred Rodgers, Pres.; Jean Stillings, Chair. Project Comm. 

JUNIORS 

in the upper division: 

what freedom, what privilege . . . 





Hazel Sewell, Kathleen Mieras, 
Louise Young, Jennie Westlake, 
Virgie Mahaffey, Lillian Salis- 
bury, Vae Shutt, Margaret Jessup 



Ruby Elliott, Carolyn Keener, Mrs 
Effie Brown, Buena Bailey, Eula 
Mae Turner, Mabel Center, Jeanie 
James, Margaret DeBruhl, Jac- 
queline Aiken 



Virginia Bates, Annie Queen, Alice 
Coodell, Ruby Boggs, Jean Fugate, 
Ruth Wesley, Margaret Allison, 
Helen Smith, Lois Haun, Jean 
Vandiver 



Naomi Chafin, Miriam Eller, 
Claribel Breazaele, Anne Coates, 
Margaret Armbrister, Jeanette Ford, 
Laurette Head, Eulene Sherman.. 




10 more of that check in, check out fuss at the library 




Delmas Pennington, Blanche Ingra- 
ham, Bill Jones, Frederick Kirsch, 
Mary Elizabeth McClure, Shirley 
Salisbury, Imogene Thomas, Freida 
Popenhagen, Melvin Cassady 



Mary Elizabeth Beaty, Mabel June 
Brice, Marian Campbell, Susan 
Cochran, Bernice Clark, Donald 
Singleton, Sara Slusher 



Margaret Williamson, Betty Gajew- 
ski, Zuria Farmer, Margerilla 
Branham, Louise Cady, Rena Yount, 
Inez Wallace, Novella Fuller, Eloise 
Sparks 



and you send your church cards to the u.d. office 



Argie Miller, Esther Vodola, Juanita 
Hatten, Marie Highfield, Esther 
Wertheimer, Margie Mantooth, 
Karen Taylor, Sarah Zicafoose, 
Ruth Law, Kathleen Mitchell 



Sara Nell Dill, Lucille Holmes, 
Lucy Goins, Audrey Singleton, Fern 
Goode, Jennie Self, Lillian England, 
Miriam Brandenburg, Ella Morgan, 
Libby Alexander 



Betty Jean King, Alice Fulk, Vir- 
ginia Ott, Joy Shepherd, Frances 
Evans, Mary Mitchell, Gladys Kin- 
ley, Frances Nunley, Kathleen 
Rowe 




<W* A r% ' n 




.<. 



■fS < ~*« 



.-.. '-- *■ ^ 



. '. x~ ■ 




/ou're practically a senior — it won't be long now 



SOPHOMORES 




Louis McCord, President; Betty Jane Lowe, Secretary; Mary K. Fielder, 
Chairman Social Committee; Kathleen Roberts, Chairman Project Com- 
mittee; June McFarland, Treasurer; Frisby Smith, Vice-President 

it's a good year, your sophomore year: 

gone is the lost feeling of freshman days; gone is the unsureness 





Poage Eversole, Aileen Lewis, Dorothy 
Schwinn, Lillian Davis, Helen Forloine, 
Elizabeth Fearing, Clenna Smith, Frances 
Hilton, Mary Ogle 



you know Berea is the place for you, now that there's no more dish- 
washing . . . 



Elizabeth Hunt, Jennie Rose Poynter, 
Pauline Sloan, Patricia Williamson, Thelma 
Sutton, Ruby Parris, Thelma Bates 

Eva Elmore, Opalee Smith, Anna Wills, 
Rosemary Wetzel, Katharine Davis, Re- 
bekah Horton, Virginia Balden, Lois Bas- 
sett, Lucia Skalski 



Anna Copeland, Pat Bryant, Margaret 
Graham, Edith Kyser, Billa Jean Peters, 
Evelyn Hibbard 

Eugene Stollings, Leon Wesley, Lucille 
Davis, Joe Houston, Alma Smith, Lee 
Gentry, Frank Edwards, Elizabeth Lutton, 
Kirkpatrick Adams 





Cecelia Plymale, Nancy Hess, Dollie En- 
evoldsen, Sara Jo McGuire, Dorothy Hilberg, 
Rosebelle Elkins, Cecelia Schroder, Polly- 
anna Brumley 

Bert Bray, Frisby Smith, Gene Dougherty, 
Russell Beach, Bill Norton, Jack Smith, 
Charles Snyder, Clara Newton, Leonora 
Hoernlein, Pauline Newton, Katherine 
Leatherwood, Evelyn Collins 



Bobbie Hillman, Agnes Ratcliff, Dorothy 
Dingus, Margaret Duncan, Mary Allen 
Wager, Betty Jo Rankin, Florence Elam, 
Ruth Slusher, Hope Mayhew, Bernice Clark, 
Joyce Hardin 

Elizabeth Stafford, Wilma Pigman, Ann 
Skinner, Alda Ruth Morris, June Lane, 
Kathleen Browning, Charlcie Robinson 



it's the last year you'll take physed, if you persist with the Gold th- 
warting . . . 



you've decided on your major, you're on your way to upper division 



Inez Helton, Juanita Turner, Dora Nan 
Peace, Marion Branum, Marjorie Ota, 
Corrine Sparks, Virginia Godby, Florence 
Begley, Marian Nassau, Doris Watson 



Orriel Solley, Tharon Musser, Christine 
LaFon, Ruth Schell, Carolyn Killough, Vir- 
ginia Ellis, Erma Lee Francis, Ozella Hurst 



Corsie Croucher, Evalee Williams, Minor 
Munsey, Marie Lay, Delcie Davenport, 
Polly Gregg, Betty Gregg, Mary Virginia 
Bell, Margaret Larew, Eloise Vance, Ruth 
Salisbury 

Mary Helen Adkins, Dove Altizer, Ruth 
Ferrill, Imogene Maney, Dorothy Wheeler, 
Ovadene Beaty, Beulah Harper, Norma 
York, Pansy Fern Morton 




FRESHMEN 




Frank Hall, Treasurer; Charles Haywood, President; Clarence Hicks, Vice- 
President; David Capps, Secretary 



help! orientation , registration, dish pans, big sisters! big 
brother! Dean Shutt, water boy, water boy, water boy . . . 




Peggy Hicks, Jack Adams, Ruby Holbrook, 
Eileen Bentley, Nelle Shuler, Betty Jane 
McCutcheon, Evelyn Helms, Roberta 
Merrer, Jo Richards, J. E. Soper 




^reen as Berea grass, grass dotted with sack suppers, summer 
: rocks and Navy jumpers . . . 



Virginia Thoroughman, Delia Miller, Al- 
fredo McCoy, Elva Martin, Frances Berkley, 
Elizabeth Fogle, Mary Ellen Ayer, Evelyn 
Hopkins, Ruth Burnett 

Zella Wager, Thelma Darnell, Pauline 

Swanson, Jean Hudson, Betty Imrie, 

Jaunita Hughes, Mable Wright, Harriet 
Hoffman, Irene Baker 



Shirley Wills, Virginia Mitchener, Myra 
Collins, Elizabeth Cook, Joyce Jenkins, 
Isabel White, Betty Shufflebarger, Marie 
Mitcham, Nadine Compton, Lenore Cab- 
bard, Maxine Jennings, Jan Cotton, Daphne 
Miller 

Daisy Garden, Gretka Young, Julia Fields, 
Mildred Beverly, Cleo Keith, Wilma Mobley, 
Eleanor Easton, Jaunita Breeding, Anita 
Pearson, Doris Dungan, Dorothy Shrader 





Ivella Sharpe, Margaret Mulkey, LaWanda 
Curtis, Winifred Evins, Eleanor Denison, 
Cleora Conley 

Evelyn and Betty Swingle, Lillie Pressley, 
Anna Sue O'Daniel, Elizabeth Abbott, 
Maggie Puckett, Nina Sprinkle 



Cora Saylor Nickles, Helen Pulver, Ora Lee 
Beck, Joan Stephens, Pauline Gill, Colette 
Rieben 

Dorothy Tredennick, Virginia Henderson, 
Marjorie Cabbard, Delores Sallengs, Elnora 
Goodman, Kathryn Carpenter, Alta Whitt, 
Eliazabeth Vodola. 



mom! dad! contemplated packing up and going back where w< 
came from . . . just contemplated . . . 



Felt right at home dancing in Woods-Penn . . . never knew the good 
Did days they talked about . . . thank goodness' 



Lorraine Salyer, Brigitte Auerbach, Olga 
Smith, Doris Davies, Edith York, Jean 
Wolfe, Pauline Swanson, Alice Russell, 
Maxine Davis, Zenobia Hope, Cassie 
Harville 

Elizabeth Hollandsworth, Angeline Bur- 
chert, Vera Mae Burchett, Louise Proffitt, 
Fannie Litton, Hattie Sorah, Phyllis Jones, 
Doris Neal, Sue Hill 



Beulah Davis, Lela Mae Taylor, Mary 
Stevens, Helen Carrithers, Lela Watson, 
Irene Pigman, Genevieve Cockrell, Jean 
Hudson, Dorothy Bishop, Lucille Crumpler 

Emily Huff, Jaunita Fugate, Jane Hager, 
Barbara McBee, Scott Warrick, James 
King, Mary Phillips, Jane Threlkeld, Harry 
Craft, Betty Lou Powers 





Nancye McGuire, Caby Jean Smith, Nau- 
dine Mills, Faye Stewart, Guinola Hill, 
Mary Stafford, Edna Stafford, Margaret 
Ketchersid, Edith Dunagan 

Pauline Oliver, Fay Penley, Joan Rowe, 
Marjorie Muncy, Esther Spence, Jean 
Clark, Frances Bradshaw, Mary Lou Keen- 
er, Frances Finnell 



Jean Taylor, Anita Grant, Wanda Batson, 
Alice Nicholas, Sadie Cordier, Mary 
Elizabeth Cordier, Dorothy Palmer, Bar- 
bara Parnell, Evelyn Dillow, Lillian Davis, 
Helen Davis 

Matt Bullins, Dixon Bailey, Feddie Fugate, 
Samuel Scruggs, William Nelson, William 
Perry, Fritz Watson, Nobuyuki Yokogawa, 
Preston Johnston, Charles Elliott 



freshman comp with Jiggs — "why I like Berea, 
thought, but there's something about the place 



// 



hadn' - 



:an't stretch after my first trek up the mountains ... fell off a cliff 
aughing at some chesty sailor wedged in Fat Man's A/\isery . 



Faye Skean, Ruth Mary Liddle, Mary 
Stylos, Eloise Oliver, Hilda Rhea, Gladys 
Fetzer, Nancy King, Kathleen Jett, Sally 
Shimanaka, Mary Ann Smith 

Ida Peterson, Margaret Love, Dorothy 
Turpin, Mitchell Hutchms, Cleda Penning- 
ton, Juanita Noland, Carolyn Caudill, 
Gayle Asher, Pearl Thomas, Elizabeth 
Hiott, Robbie Sowards, Virginia McCoy 



Curtis Baldwin, Robert Wallace, Paul Red- 
mon, William Harrill, Dale Carter, James 
Bayes, Lily Cornett, John Ross, Eugene 
Melgaard, John Younge 

Charles Mowrey, Reuben Hunter, Gilbert 
McKee, Audrey Majors, Thedora Waddell, 
Jessie Piercy, Bobby Hicks, Verna Hall, 
Elizabeth Tincher 



7^ 





Betty Jo Mallonee, Nancy Testerman, 
Grace Popplewell, Laura Lee Hale, Roberta 
Lake, Rosalynn Love, Doris Galloway 

Annis Dodd, Helen Armbrister, Mary 
Elizabeth Jones, Laura Sturgill, Margery 
Murphy, Mary Gill, June Stanley, Thelma 
Coleman, Scharlene Oney, Garnetta Shan- 
non 



Mildred Payne, Catherine Taylor, Lee Roy 
McClure, Charles McNeer, Mary Lou 
Baker, Elizabeth Crumbley, Allene Garrett, 
Paul Settles, Walter Smith, Samuel Hubbard 

Ruth Stephens, Samuel Hurst, Jean Harris, 
Edward Carpenter, Anna Clair, William 
Snedegar, Eloise Wise, Charles Elliot 



Dean True said to have a destination after evening dishes . . . des- 
tination where hamburgers stay or go with onions and mustard, 




Maggie Thome, Lillian McCoun, Louise 
Walters, Patricia Stewart, Jeanne Hardy, 
Marian Ealson, Delia Abney, Ruby Lester, 
Frankie Ruth Mease, Lora Adkins, Bonnie 
Evans 



Nina Clark, Jane Fleenor, Rena DeHart, 
Ellen Cadle, Eileen Barnawell, Aileen 
Blevins 



scolded in the reserve room, demerited for sleeping through 
dishes, caught lingering on the porch . . . Sweet Memories' 




12TH GRADE 



s s*^ 




Wilma Horton, Secretary; Calvin Baird, Vice-President; Ruth Smith, Chair- 
man Social Committee; Joe Austin, President; Eleanor Bent, Chairman 
Project Committee; Avis Jarrell, Treasurer 



our last year of "Academy Division" . . . college looks awfully close 
now and we begin to worry about sixteen credits and Eng- 
lish 99 . . . psychology and fascinators have been the cur- 
rent fads of our class ... we have kissed our share 



-£S*» 




James Hesselgesser, James Caines, 
Lida Caudill, James Skeens, Geneva 
Mullins, DeKern Lang, Earl Ruth, 
Joanne Turner, Nila Mae Blair, Inez 
Lucas, Winifred Garvin, Anne 
Jennings, Glena Ryan 



Kendrick Smith, Eugene Cady, 
Beulah Rector, Doris Speck, Jessie 
Clark, Buddy Hibbard, Johanna 
Kranold 



David Holliday, Sam Hodges, Anna 
Mary Lapsley, Betty Bell, Jack 
Mitchell, Sue Kilbourne 




of the boys good-by and we've won our share of the dia- 
monds . . we haven't minded the sailors in the least . . 




David Williams, Wilma Savior, 
Lucille Wilkerson, Grace Miller, 
Dean Lambert, Don Murphy, Al- 
berta Thomas 



Ellen Reynolds, Anna Jane Pound- 
stone, Sanford Jones, Peggy Watts, 
Charles Keyser, Mona Hamblin, 
Frances Edwards 



Susan Deyton, Winifred Garvin, 
Frances Dennen, Geraldine Hooker, 
Arietta Hogan, Bethel Moore, 
Kathlyn Troutman, Melba Mc- 
Williams, Fairie Jones 



we 
the 



gloated over the college people that had to eat with us in 
commons . . . we've sat starry eyed in Mrs. Peck's 



Eva Calmes, Billy Belcher, llleene 
Stanley, Elbert Miller, Myrtle Bar- 
rett, Theresa Johnson, Bert Johnson, 
Lewis Biggerstaff 



Ann White, Carolyn Suiter, Darrol 
Nickels, Dorris Piatt, Eleanor 
Weekes, Eleanor Morgan, Joyce 
Lockhart, Bobby Wesley 



Betty Acker, Joan Ridlehoover, 
Wilma Ellison, Alice Refo, Helen 
Cawood, Estelle Daniels, Ruby 
Campbell, Betty Blakey, Sally Bur- 
ton, Lena Gooding, Frances Bu- 
chanan 




class and relived the history that she acted for us . . . we've had 
a taste of war when our class president marched away.. 




Ray Tudor, H. A. Porter, Jean 
Emerson, Richard Wilson, Donald 
Cray 



Sarah Talbot, Dorothy Ison, Orrin 
Taubee, Mary Goans, Aretta 
Shrewsberry 



now we've ended our rivalry with "fruit jar" ... we have lived 
up to our motto and loved it because our motto has been "fun". 



11TH GRADE 




William Robinson, Treasurer; Genevieve Graham, Secretary; Molly Scholl, 
Vice-President; Helen Hardesty, President 

. . this is our first year in lower division and yet we 
nd ourselves on the same level with college students... 



Margaret Bishop, Mary Sue Cole, Evelyn Ledford, 
Williams, Avenell Rose, Maxine Caldwell 



Billy Barlow, Helen 





Guindola Johnson, Elma Isaacs, Bessie 
Spurlock, Walter Gee, Hazel Combs, Clara 
Brewer, Azaleea Casey, Emma Lee Combs, 
Wayne Breazeale 

John Holroyd, George Stephens, Jean 
Hoskins, Cordon Homes, Margaret Taylor, 
Robert Dodd 



Clyde Ramey, Katherine Campbell, Alene 
Mullins, Earl Woods, Pauline Caudill, 
James Wey 

James Barker, Robert Fowler, Jerry Fish, 
Herbert Shadowen, Grover Miller, Bernice 
Overley, Georgia Richie, Malcolm Murray, 
Robert Amburgey, Mae Marcum 



we have more civilian boys than any other class . . . our free 
time thoughts have run to sailors and curls and porch lights .. 



we worry about blue slips from deans, cutting gym, and getting 
light cuts . . . well, perhaps we don't really worry, we just wonder 



Gloria Edwards, William Crouch, Edward 
Cook, Flora Cofield, Helen Burnett, Velma 
Mar: ha 1 1 

Dallas Monk, Mary Golden Saferight, Betty 
Horton, Majorie Keener, Gloria Jean Chris- 
tian, Opal Hurt, Cecil Hedrick 



John Welsh, Helen Smith, Charles Blantcn. 
Alvin Wilson, Margaret Churchill, Robert 
Bent, Mildred Johnson 

Marie Howard, Patricia Prater, Ray Dur- 
ham, Clarine Sutton, Edward Cook, Mar- 
garet Semple, William Howard, Paulena 
York, Viola Meadows, Wanda Farmer, 
Fannye Hensley 



I - ■ MS&& 




". . . BY HEROES IMPLANTED . . ." 

A man mobbed twenty-two times, tarred and feathered by citizens of his own state, a "rock- 
ribbed dogmatist," an active and irritating reformer— such a man was John G. Fee, abolition- 
ist son of a slaveholding Kentuckian, and founder of Berea College. He entered Lane 
Theological Seminary in Cincinnati, a school known as a hotbed of anti-slavery agitators, and 
after much perplexity and struggle he decided to join the ranks of the fanatics. Disowned 
by his father when he expressed his conviction that he should aid in abolishing slavery, in- 
temperance, and other current sins, he set about preaching his doctrines. 

But his own people would not accept him; he was kicked out of the Presbyterian Church. And 
then he and Cassius M. Clay got together. "Cash," cousin of the famous Henry Clay, had 
come under William Lloyd Garrison's influence at Yale; and he, like Fee, the son of Kentucky 
slaveowning parents, took up the abolitionist cause. 

Fee and smooth-tongued Clay often spoke from the same platform. Clay didn't hesitate to 
back Fee up with pistols and bowie knives. Slamming them down beside the Bible on the 
pulpit, he would say, "This man is going to have a fair hearing." Fee established churches in 
various counties, and at Clay's invitation came to Madison county in 1853 to build a church 
which boasted thirteen members at the outset. The ten acres of land given him by Clay was 
the original site of the Berea school where the brotherhood of man was put into action, as well 
as words. 

When he fell in love with Matilda Hamilton, a lively girl, from his home county of Bracken, 

he didn't pop the question till she was converted and joined the church. Her keen wit, her 

housewifely virtues, her ability to grow beautiful flowers, and her way of riding horseback to 
see the sick made her beloved to Fee and to persons in her community. 

Neighbors thought Fee went looking for trouble when he broke state laws to uphold what he 
called "Higher Law." He and Clay never agreed on this. Clay believing that it was good policy 
to obey man-made laws till they were legally repealed. Fee constantly reproved Clay for 
drinking and swearing, and he was thoroughly disgusted when warrior Clay marched off to 
the Mexican war. Final collision came in 1856, and many influential Kentuckians followed 
Clay's lead in dropping their support of the newly-formed school. 

Angry mobs used to drag Fee out, threatening to hang him. Once when a mob was carrying 
him and a companion to beat them and send them across the Ohio river, a rain came up and 
the party went into a house for shelter. Fee made use of the time to read a portion of the 
Scripture and pray. Their spirits deflated, the vicious crowd departed. Nine remained to 
escort Fee to the county border where they told him to beat it, and courteously offered him a 



drink of whiskey. Seizing the opportunity, he began o sermon on the evils of drink, and Hie 
nine rode off at full speed. 

But the school progressed. Mr. and Mrs. J. A. R. Rogers, he an Oberlin graduate, came to help 
the Fees at Berea, which was then a desolate ridge referred to as "the Bresh." George Candcc, 
another Oberlin man, came, asking, "Shall I preach or teach?" Fee, with a sweeping 
gesture, replied, "We ought to have a school here and educate, not merely in the ordinary 
branches of learning, but in love, as first in religion, and in justice, as first in government. 
We must enlist the young people." And they did. Fifteen pupils registered for the first 
term of school in 1858, with a one-room, unpainted structure for their shelter. Rogers was a 
scholar, and he saw that students crammed sound learning into their heads. Outside school 
hours were spent grubbing the thicket away. Dr. Rogers later reported, "Those who hadn't 
begun to dig at Greek roots dug at oak ones." 

Hundreds of people riding on horseback to see the experiment were impressed. A member of 
the Kentucky legislature, having made a speech at the commencement exercises, whispered to 
a friend, "If this school goes on in this way, the niggers will be free, but I'm going to hold 
onto mine as long as I can." Higher grades were introduced in the school, and Berea Col- 
lege was organized in 1858, "to furnish the facilities for a thorough education to all persons 
of good mora! character." Fee was encouraged by success, and he went North to raise funds. 

Headlines in Kentucky newspapers glared, "John G. Fee Is in Beecher's Church Calling for 
More John Browns." He wasn't. He had said, in Beecher's church, "We want more John 
Browns, not in manner of action, but in consecration: not to go with carnal weapons, but with 
spiritual . . ." But slaveholders took up the cry, demanding that the Berea teachers leave 
the ridge. So a sad-hearted crusader met the band of Berea exiles in Ohio. Attempts to go 
back to their work during the war were repulsed, and the school did not reopen until 1865. 

From this time on there was steady progress in scholarship. Henry Fairchild was the first 

president of the reorganized Berea College. Under his leadership much building was done. 

From the original ten acres, the campus had grown to 109 in 1866— with no endowment, 

no credit, no building. But Howard Hall was erected, and then Fairchild, and Lincoln Hall! 

Berea College now has more than one hundred buildings. It possesses 6,000 acres of land- 
campus, farm, and forest. Present endowment and plant assets are more than 513,000,000. 
The periods of administration of President William G. Frost I 1892- 1920 > and President William 
J. Hutchins (1920-1939. saw great advances made. The staff grew; students grew. More 
was taught, and more was learned. 

Southern highlanders have had handicaps-social, economic, political. For them especially 
Berea College was founded. 




drink to the foam... 





Commanding Officer . . . 
Lt. H. R. Dunathan . . . 

learned . . . considerate 
. . . dignified and quiet 
mannered 



Our Executive Officer . . . Lieutenant John 
Kessier . . . scrupulous Saturday inspections 
. . . cheerful natured . . . 

Our Medical Officers . . . Lieutenant Com- 
mander James Fuller and Lieutenant 
George Calderwood . . . their treatment for 
head colds discourages "gold-bricking" 




L« ...-•,: ■ 




Chief Jake H. Moser 



• his Chief Charles Cummings ... the 

track team sprinted to victory "little chief" . . . j ud o dynamo 



at the helm 



these pilot our world 



Ihief Leonard Pickett . . . "the Chief Sam Fox 
yes of Texas are upon you" brain trust 



basketball Chief Ed Petro . . . coached 
basketball the "Rhode Island 
way" 





DonaldClark . . . Pharmacist's Mate . . . dignified dape deale, 

Paul Brazer . . . g. i. haberdasher j 

Chief Horn and Store-keeper Neuman 

Pharmacist's Mate McLain . . . nipping again, Mac? 

Bob Clements . . . specialist in wine, woman and athlete s foo 



BLUE RIDGE HALL 



1st row- Ervin, Crawford, Blunck, Morison, Williamson, Fairchild, Kiel, Fetzer Pulliam Boker 

Fnedlander, Monk, Nave, Anderson, Bennett, Collett, Thweatt 

2nd row— Wilkinson, McCormick, Chandler, Gold, Fliegelman, Sturtevant, Troll Brer-z* ^ r .,. r 
Sherburne, Murray, Dermont, Smith, Witt, Halvorson, Helton, Vandorn 

3rd row— Copeland, Boone, Kreidler, Becker, Carter, Cochran, Comer Skillern Bre,r Duff 
Turner, King, Jenkins, Collins, Hoag, Clark 







i m 



m t; 



TTM.t?TTU!,!-?M'1i 



r +> 



m 



1st r ow-Anthony, Hutton, Briggs, Ryan, Rassell, Barker, Smith, Rue, Wood, Fagot, Bealmear Kolp 
Anderson, Carraher, Bensey, Sizemore, Smith 



2nd row-Tice, Guthrie, Heger Fuson, McGmty, Whitfield, Fades, Cebhardt, Hymson, Shaw, Tul 
Vanderberg, Small, Donohue, Williams, Montgomery, Neumayer 

3rd row-Plantefaber, Tye, Suiter, Moeller, Ward, . Emberton, Brooks, Cone, Mansfield. Flynn W eb s 
ter, Eberhardt, Doctor, Cradit, Hopkins, Dougherty, Brady 



e, 



CUMBERLAND HALL 



1st row — Smith, Osborne, Croley, Shemwell, Rice, Estes, Ruffie, Lyon, Lindquist, Moore, West, 

Bickett, Broach, McNutt, Schillerstrom 

2nd row — Byrne, Lang, Sandman, Owen, Grischy, Broman, Strong, Paasch, Hamlin, Thomasson, 

Cleveland, Huggins, Howard, Kilbourne, Corey 

3rd row — Dumesnil, Cowen, Zimmerman, Adams, Rescho, Baker, Ludwick, Shelton, Phillips, Lynch, 

Beam, Peavyhouse, Beckers, Owen, Dimmick, Lacewell 






■-■^fc'::**! 



11??? 
If? 11 



•s '*" r 



1 ? ?1 ; 

Iff! 1 f 1 f 

f ? 1 1 1 I T 



* * 



K * i. » - -t 




^^HDv^HBHI 



1st row — Smith, Baas, Newcome, Nelson, Reed, Helm, Ulmer, Lueking, Hartley, Wayman, Meader, 
Flowers, Jeffries, Sims 

2nd row Fields, Callis, Bloomfield, Caperton, Vandivier, Heer, Trabue, Whiting, Murphy, Duble, 

Whitsitt, Runyan, Berger, Craig 

3rd row Sallee, Carter, Bergewisch, Hail, Webb, Ternes, Stahl, Haesley, Wellbaum, Shewmaker, 

Wehr, Friedberg, Pratt, Gibbs, Rose 



HOWARD HALL 

1st row— John, Cottingham, Clarke, McKenzie, Lee, Burkholder, Osmun, Berkr-r Roebuck 
Waggoner, Foltz, Smith, Myers, Edwards, Hawkins 

2nd row— Shure, Broome, Geyer, Willins, Meckling, de Venny, Wh,teman, O'Neal Parker K,rkman 
Noward, Bailey, Aszman, Bantz, Johnson, Lehnig, Gossett, Cams 

3rd row— Chief Pickett, Dunning, Meyer, Hartloff, Barrow, Meyers, Conarroe, Travers West Milev 
M,ller, Owen, Hansen, Wheeler, McNeely, Wilson, Agnew, Morris, Willett, Williams, Slocum 





...in the 







by the dawn's early light 



strutting our stuff 








f 1| f^ 





military manner 



shoving off for chow 















J> 






| 


|A1 J^M 


- 


•» r 


■■'r 





«... »■ ■ 




e n t a 1 1 y . 



a military secret? 



looks real, doesn't it? 



working overtime 





"take yer guts in yer 
mouth and FINISH" 



grunt and groan session 



good ole swimming hole 



and physically 



"...L_i.' 



what's Tarzan got that we ain't got?" 





between the chimes . • • 



drooling 



fooling 



fueling 



'stooling" 




I can cook, too' 






•TAKE YOURs CHOICE • • • 




CfT, 



K o 9 -~m • . \j ♦-* - *? . io 



= If] #} 



RECREATIONAL PROGRAM • 3AT. AU6.2.8 



life kinda switched up on us this year, what with a powder room off the dance floor and posters in 
the hallways reading, "Take your choice — mixed swimming, movie, games or dancing" . . . break- 
fast at 8 o'clock on Sundays, with coffee and toast . . . lower division eating at the commons ... ten 
minutes between classes ... in by eleven on Saturday nights . . . classes six days a week 

some of this year's changes we hope will stay ... but we can still wish that classes to come will have 
a chance to see snow falling through the beam of the flood on Draper tower and the miraculous 
four shadows of the tower on the clouds ... to wake in the early morning to the sound of Christ- 
mas Carols sung by the men's glee club ... to shoot the chute into a bundle of hay at the Ag 
Social ... to relax on Sunday afternoons at the art building, in the Capehart Room, or climbing 
Pilot's Knob ... to use Monday to write that term paper or wash those dirty socks ... to depend 

more upon a date with the boy friend than just a letter ... to wait eagerly for weeks for the renowned 
chapel speaker . . . 

we'd like to hear the band again at basketball games, and the Royal Collegians playing for our 
dances ... we want others to like horsecollars, real cokes, and fire balls as much as we did . . . 
we'd appreciate a serenade from A.Z., and it would be nice to see plays at the Tabernacle with 
several men on the stage at once . . . we'd like to fill Pearson Ho!! with a hundred u. d. men instead 
of just five . . . and what about those Christmas vacations with two long weeks to spend at home 



we hear the count of "hup, two, three, four" and remember the call that once cut across the campus, 
"lower division!" 




TWENTY WRITERS . . . WALL-PAPER 
TOO MUCH LIKE SAROYAN 

£ Lucy told me to write this.. I guess I must have told her a thousand times that 
it wouldn't go; that it sounded too much like something Saroyan had beaten out when he 
hadn't much else to do. I told her, "Lucv, honey, even if things like that do happen, there's 
no percentage in writing about them, because everybody just thinks you're shooting the bull 
anyway." But she wouldn't listen to me. She told me to write it all up, and then some big 
magazine would buy it sure. So. 

I was up at Lucy's over my leave. We had five days off, and I spent most of it walk- 
ing around her home town like a peacock, looking at our reflections, Lucy's and mine 
together, in all the plateglass windows, and patting myself on the back because Lucy is such 
a beautiful thing and I am the luckiest gob in the Fleet to have her. 

One night we were going over to see some friends of hers, namely one Hilda Something 
and her boy friend. But somehow or other we got all loused up getting there and finally had 
to stop in at some little all-night cafe to call for directions. 

It was a crummy sort of joint. You know the type: a few tables, bum lights, a noisy 
juke-box — atmosphere that you scrape off with a spoon. There was a phone-booth in the 



back, and Lucy went into it to put in her call. I waited up by the counter, and tossed a 
casual eye at the waitress. 

Then this big Swede comes up beside me and asks me if I want a beer. He's a six 
footer with gray hair and a breath that would lay you out at twenty paces; he's got on a worn- 
out looking coat and a pair of pants that might have matched something once. And he doesn't 
look like he's got a dime to his name. As a matter of fact, when I first see him I think 
that maybe there's going to be a bite. But when he offered me the brew, I saw that he was a good 
boy. 

I told him, "No thanks, Mac," and after trying to twist my arm, he got the idea and 
moseyed off. I watched him go over to a corner table, where a guy and his broad were lapping 
it up. Some shoe-shine kid had been arguing with the guy to let him shine his shoes, but the 
guy didn't go for the idea much, especially since the babe was just about stewed enough to 
be useful. Then the big Swede comes up and stands over the guy and growls something, and 
hands the kid a quarter. The kid grins and starts to shine the guy's shoes for all he is worth. 
And the Swede just stood over the guy 'til the job was finished. 

I could see the Swede sort-of liked this gag. He get a dumb-Swede smile on his face, 
and, with the kid in tow, he went over to three more guys in a row, and made each one of them 
take a shine too, with him footing the bill. He was having one hell of a time. 

By this time Lucy had finished making her call, and had come out of the booth. She 
was fixing her hair or something, and I was lighting a cigarette, getting ready to shove off 
for Hilda's. We were half-way to the door when up pops the old Swede again. He slaps 
down a ham on my shoulder gently, like you pole an ox, and booms out to Lucy, "Is dis your 
sailor?" 

Lucy, having been with me long enough so as to take anything in her stride, says, "He 
sure is!" 

"Ahhhhhh! Dot's fine! He iss a fine sailor. I luff him! All you need to see is 
dot uniform. Dot tells you all you need to know! He is a fine boy. Fine!" 

Lucy looked at me sort of surprised, like, Who the hell is this guy? The Swede caught 
the eye, and bellowed, 

"Ya, I know. I'm notting but a Goddam — pardon me, lady — I'm notting but a lousy 
drunk. But I'm right, ya. He is just the boy for a fine lady like you, ya." 

"Sure thing, pop," I says. "Talk her into it for me." 

"Ya, ya, fine people to be together 

Then the shoe-shine kid, who has a sharp eye for business, wandered over with his little 
kit and pushes the bite to me. I was about to give him the goodbye when I glanced at Lucy, 
and she's got that pleading look in her eyes, like when Gary Cooper got crippled in Pride of the 
Yankees. So I figured I might as well play too. "Sure, kid," I said, "Shine 'em up." 

And then weren't we the picture, tho. Me with my right foot ten inches off the ground, 
and the kid at my feet making those noises they make with the shining-rag, and Lucy look- 
ing tearfully at the Swede, and the Swede telling us to get married. 

"You love him, ya?" he asks. 

"Oh, yes," sighs Lucy. 

"Den marry him. He's a sailor. Look at dot uniform. And he loves you, I know 
dot. I can see I got eyes in my head. And — " he turned to me. "You love her too, ya?" 

"Hell yes, pop." 



, 



"Ahhhhhh!" He closed his eyes, turned his face toward the ceiling, and burped 
happily. "You marry. I want you should marry quick. It is a shame to wait so long. You 
are born to be married to one anodder. Ach. Gott, it's so beautiful!" 

And then all of a sudden I got it. The guy had never seen either of us before in his 
life. For all he knew, I might be a hatchet-man or a miniature golfer or something. Lucy 
might be a Borgia. But he didn't care a hott. "Do you love each odder? Ya? Den marry!" 
That was all he had to say; but, God, that was enough. 

I saw that the kid had finished on my shoes, so I slipped a quarter and grabbed Lucy 
by the hand. "Come on, Honey," I said. "We gotta get over to Hilda's." 

As we were going out the door, I heard the Swede yelling something about being best 



man. 



Outside I saw that Lucy was crying. I didn't try to stop her. Hell, it's a woman's 
privilege to gush. I figured she deserved it, for being such a wonderful thing all week. 

But I still don't see much point in writing it up. Nobody would believe it anyway, and 
besides that, it sounds too much like Saroyan. 

James Sherburne, A.S., USNR 

SNOWDREAM IN PICADSLLY, 1940 

A snowdream as wild flurries fade out 

Nasty, naked streets 

White palaces perched on white cliffs leading into deep gorges. 

Piles of white crystal rocks guarding warm caves, 

Whose dark interiors are shielding countless creatures from 

The Thunder — hark! 

Wild streaks of lightning outside stabbing and piercing through 

Fleeting clouds, emptying their burdens of — 

Snow. 

Frantic snow, rushing down between the white palaces, 

And into the deep gorges, bleaching every detail 

White. 

Through the swirling, mad night, across a white river with crystal spans, 
The mighty bong of the great timekeeper 

Echoes down, from its ivory tower as the blue moon fades 

But now, the dawn looms. . . . 

The flashes cease, and the booms. 

My snowdream fades and I must return to ruins, 

and Reality. 

James Adams, A.S., USNR 



SYMPHONY 

« An ethereal haze tentatively lifted its mvstery from the black solidity of the hills, 
then shyly let it fall again hiding every tree form and mountain ridge. Vast reaches of un- 
certainty cool, quiescent, and disturbing. Into the mother-of-pearl qu.et shot a blood red 
band-then another-bold shafts of light streaking through mist and consaousness l.ke wood- 
winds in an orchestra. Gently and almost inperceptibly the veil from the mountam tops into 
The valley pushed earthward by a triumphant glow, rose quartz in color, fortiss.rno ,n tone 
Waves of color emerged to mingle with the rose, first coral, then pearl grey a tmge of cleo 
^mon yellow-then steel blue. The mountains were transformed from indefinite black shape, 
or"h purple silhouettes superimposed against the vivid background. In that brief moment 
before the swollen ball of the sun rose above the hills for the elimahc chord, the grace and 
perfection of a bird in flight wrote the Kiting melody for the composition. 

— Dorothy Tredennick 



THAT'S WHY 



m Thev went walking along together, tall sailor and girl in saddle shoes. The rain 

rip in her shoe, making the squashy sound which marred the strange beauty of the wet n.ght. 

"I guess I'll always remember Berea in the ram. It's rained almost every week I've 
been here," he said crisply, holding his head high, with face averted. 

"Yes it does rain pretty often . . . But I don't know what I'll especially remember 
about Berea when I'm gone. When I graduate June will be here and Apnl rams will be over 
—so maybe I'll remember sun and green grass and flowers. 

Silence followed her reply. Looking expectantly up to him, she saw lips firmly shut 
eyes fixed on nothing in particular. With hands thrust deep in his f^P^'^^ 
ahead with longer steps. He felt, though he did not see, that she lengthened her ■ steos to 



ahead with longer steps. He felt, though he did nor see, mar ^ -y--'- ":" 
match his but still he said nothing The air g^ew elder. Her gloveless hands could have 
none nto her pockets- resolutely she kept them out. It would not have been right to put her 
finger undents arm, close to" his warm coat. And the sharpness of the cold-feelmg was 
part of the night. They walked. They waited. 

just as her tooth-chattering became almost audible, he said, "Let's get a coke," and 
they stopped at Little Mama's. Having settled on ice cream cones and potato ch.ps they 
licked gingerly until a gang of sailors marched noisily up the street, singing, Happy ,s the day 
when the navy gets its pay, and we go sailing home . . . 

Quickly he put his hand holding the ice cream down. He answered her wondering 

If she wondered, she didn't say so. A man in a passing car yelled, "Sailor, it's a 
wet night for the business'" Houses along the street were dark and quiet, except for one in 
which o pajamaed little girl leaned out an upstairs window until her mother pulled her 
awav and turned the light out. 

Thev came to Dr. Weekes' house, and turned to retrace their path, neither of them 
having suggest that they do so. Suddenly he burst forth: "I don't know what I ve always 
wanted never thought much about it. I mean, I never thought I'd teach or be a lawyer 

o a doctor or anything like that. But now-. Well, I'm in the navy, and-. Oh, it s good 
enough God knows we don't have it tough like the guys who are really ,n it. And ,f I 



didn't believe I should be here, I wouldn't I mean, — ." He broke off, searching for a 
way to convey to her what he meant. 

"I know," she said, "You know we've got to fight and we've got to win this war and 
that you have to help. But you don't know what the total pattern is." 

"Yeah — that says it ... I have a feeling that, even when I don't say a thing in 
words, you know what I mean. Sometimes I feel as though you think right along with me." 

"Yes," she said positively. 

"Thinking means a lot to a man, and when you're in the navy you — well, you take 
orders. That's necessary. But if will be good when the war is over and we can be ourselves. 
I get hungry for a time when I can wear trousers different from the ones of the guy next to 
me, and not conform to all the little conventions." 

Her hands were terribly cold. She breathed sharply, and quickly put her fingers under 
his arm. It seemed to her then that his arm pressed closer to his side, against her fingers — 
but maybe not. 

"Um-huh," she agreed. "That's why people are different. That's why men wear 
green hats and women wear red dresses." 

"And red blouses," he concluded, laughing down at her. The thing she wore wasn't 
a blouse; it was a dickey — but it was red. The color wasn't visible in the dark, so he had 
remembered. 

Elizabeth Rogers was lighted from top to bottom. They stood outside in the cold misty 
drizzle. It was time to say the final good night and goodbye. 

He took the hand she had placed under his arm, and held it tightly. — But he turned 
away from her upturned face. 

"I guess this is it," — abruptly. 

"Luck!" — softly. 

She looked after him as he left, until she could no longer see his white cap. Then she 
walked inside, and stood by the signing-in table. Her left hand was very warm, and she 
smiled as she rubbed it against the cold one. 

— Virginia Osborne 



SPRING AWAKENING 

I whispered, "tolerance," 
But a mighty wind engulfed it. 
I cautioned, "patience," 
But the angry waters roared on. 
I breathed, "love," 

And saw the oak bud unfold its lacy bloom. 

— Clarence Steinberger 



BROTHAH GAWD 

Gawd ain' no big stick man, 

Walkin' 'round, puttin' fear in man. 

He ain' dat kind. 

He sho' is fine! 

He don' want hate 'n' hell; 

He jus' wants all things to go well. 

Gawd ain' no big stick man. 

He runs things wid a soft hand. 

Gawd, da Spirit, is life's wine. 

Halleluya! He's mine! 

Cecelia Schroder 

THE PATRiARCH OF THE PARK 

Old father, leaning heavy on your cane, 
Withered sage so grey and stooped with care, 
You make my heart cry out in bitter pain, 
Feeding pigeons from your meagre fare! 

You fling white bread crumbs on the cobbled ground 
And greedy hordes swoop down in winged grace — 
The trappings of this world you have not found 
But oh, that flick'ring sun-beam on your face! 

— Ida Petersen 



BELOVED DESPOT 

© Not only did Grandma have a lasting influence on my life; she ran the whole house- 
hold. She was on hand the day I made my debut in this world and she didn't take her eyes 
off me until St. Peter opened the Golden Gate for her. 

When I reached school age, Grandma decided that it was nonsense to send me to Poca- 
hontas to school. Her children had gone to a country school, she reminded Mother, and there 
was no reason why the family should "get uppety" now. So I went to the country school. 
It was Grandma who decided that the old Chevrolet could last another year, that we should 
buy an old house instead of building a new one. She was a practical and unrelenting 
ruler. 

Grandma was innately religious. She always said grace before meals — long eloquently 
phrased blessings that frequently put us children to sleep. Every morning before breakfast, 
the family knelt in the living room, legs numb and eyes half-open, while Grandma prayed her 
way around the world, asking God's blessings on Europe, Africa, and Asia. When she had 
worked back around to the United States, she became more specific and prayed for each 
county individually. 

Grandma had very definite standards of Christian conduct. She was horrified the first 
time she saw my father smoking. And when Mother got a permanent wave she threatened 
to leave home. Of course, having no place to go, she never made good her threat. 



She fought waste with the fervor of a New Englander. My earliest recollections of her 
are connected with such maxims as "Waste not; want not." I always ate my cereal and vege- 
tables because she said that uneaten food would dance on my bed at night. 

When I was eight years old, Grandma kissed me and went smiling to her reward. We 
still miss her — but I know she's happy. I can see her now as she walks down those streets of 
gold, looking up at God with an accusing eye and telling him, "Brick would have been more 
practical." 

— Virginia Mitchener 

FARMHOUSE AT NIGHT 

Sarah stuck her head through the door to announce, "The bread's already on the 
table." The men who had congregated about the "heatin' stove" temporarily dropped their 
discussion of what to plant on the lower twenty and moved to the kitchen, bringing with them 
the pleasant odors of damp shirts, hay, and warm milk. 

They washed their hands in the basin by the window and slid into their places at the 
table — the three teen-age boys on the wooden bench, the two hired hands across from them, 
and Ed at the head of the table. After Sarah had chunked more wood in the old-fashioned 
stove, she slipped into her place at the foot. Ed turned down the wick of the flickering kero- 
sene lamp and said grace. (Somehow prayer seemed more sacred with the lights turned low.) 

The table around which they gathered was covered with a worn oilcloth of apple and 
peach design. The plain silverware bore signs of long use. Some of the plates had flower 
designs on them, some no designs at all. Ed served the food — string beans, fried corn, and 
juicy red beets, all canned by bustling, penny-pinching Sarah the previous summer. The 
cornbread was brown and crisp, the butter firm and yellow. 

The men were talking of farm problems. Ed told the ruddy faced farm hand, "You'd 
better turn old Mandy dry next week." Sarah sat quietly, interrupting only to tell Ed that 
the chickens were without laying mash. On the other side of the table, completely uncon- 
scious of the conversation of their elders, the three boys were discussing their chances of 
winning the county basket-ball tournament. Sarah got up to put some more wood in the 
stove. 

Outside, the March wind whipped and knocked at the windows. Inside, the cat purred 
contentedly in the woodbox behind the stove and shadows danced on the dingy walls. 

— Virginia Mitchener 

REMEMBER THE SUMMER? 

Remember the summer we spent on a hill 

In a green shaded place where the grass was tender? 

We argued war and the right to kill; 

We argued God and freedom of the will — 

Jonathan Edwards, "unto Caesar render." 

And then we sang to your violin; 

And then we stopped and argued again 

Until we grew tired and went down to the creek, 

Where we watched the minnows in a sun-dappled pool, 

And put in our feet and got them cool. 

We sat on the log and sang again, 

And we parted saying "auf Wiedersehn." 

And you went off with your violin. 

Dorothy Hilberg 





To Former Members of the Class of '44: 

In September 1940 our class filled Woods-Penniman auditorium. For the first time we 
heard President Hutchins speak; energetic Prof. Rigby taught us to sing "Jackie Boy- 
Master." We were a large freshman class. 

We aren't large now. For a class meeting we use only about one-fourth of the seats in 
Upper Chapel. One by one throughout these four years you have gradually dropped out. 
Now you're in the Army, the Navy, the Air Corps, or the Marines. You're a WAC, a 
WAVE, a nurse; you're married, or you hold down an essential war job. We're proud of 
you, the ones of us who are left in Berea. 

Occasionally you return for a few days. Clyde Flannery taps his little bell in the board- 
ing hall to introduce you. We clap enthusiastically, and you stand and grin self-con- 
sciously. Sometimes there is a touch of envy in us for the things you are doing now, for 
the very real part you play in our world today. Then we remind ourselves that staying in 
school is our part in the crisis. 

We are the same class that sang "Berea Beloved" from mimeographed sheets in Woods- 
Penniman auditorium; only now we're in England, Italy, on the Pacific, or perhaps in 
Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, Tampa, Atlanta, Knoxville — and Berea. 

The Senior Class 




here are some of you . . . the ones we could find pictures of.. Mason McNeer — Lenore misses 
him . . . Michael Fuhrmann — remember his . fascinating accent in Speech class . . . Staunton 
King — the dope . . . Bob Wheeler — vocalist for the Royal Collegians . . . Arh'e and Bob Adams 
— we always did like red hair . . . Ginny Draughon — we borrowed her bicycle once . . . Mary 
Nell Sharpe — we'd like to hear her at the piano again . . . Frank Stillings — he was leader of 
our band . . . Norman Wooten — even better in uniform . . . Marion Merchant — we knew her 
as Yeager . . . Estil Deitz — our Junior class president . . . Bill Crouch — the CHIMES misses 
his camera . . . Connie — Ma Cifford — with her husband, Harry Tomlinson. That's Bob Luff- 
burrow on the other page. Remember how crazy he can be? When we saw the picture we 
feit like saying "That's the boy, Luff — that's the way to tackle this old war." 



Vesper Hour 




and time for our class in living ... we do some of our hardest work 
during this hour, but not for college credits . . . these activities are 
extra-curricula 




Berea's music is Berea 




whether it's prof's 'The Farmer Did a Shootin' Go" or the black 
robed choir's anthem, we follow our music department's leadership 




we keep our feet sti 1 1 with 
difficulty when the band 
starts . . . 



or strive for harmony in 
rhe women's glee club . . . 




Dr spend free evening hours listening quietly and intently 
to records of our favorite classics in the Capehart room . 





here we have a chance to learn 
democracy first hand through our judicial Board of Governors 
and the legislative Lower and Upper Division Senates . . 




I » •* 111 — 1ITBI 1 



through the Women's 
Council we maintain 
self-rule in the u.d. 
women's dormitories . . . 



we go to the Vanguards 
"O search for solutions to 
}ur social problems . . . 



n our Forensics we try to 
earn to speak effective- 
y of these problems . . . 





our discussions in the Public 
Affairs Forum are on topics 
of worldwide interests . . . 
through all these we learn 
to value democracy 




Home Economics 



Agriculture Club . . . 
famous for its socials 



then there are those clubs which are concerned with en- 
joying the fields of work that we especially like 



Education . 



French Club 




-• 



Sigma Pi Sigma for physics 



Pi Alpha for test tube 
enthusiasts 



Pi Gamma Mu for social 
science 




eventually we make the Greek letter honor fraternities for our field 




we don't forget religious activities during 
vesper hours . . . there's the Y.W. and 
Y.M. on Thursday and Sunday nights 
where we work out all sorts of projects, 
such as the Thanksgiving chapel pro- 
gram which we contribute to the World 
Student Service Fund 




every afternoon right after lunch we go 
to the Prayer Group in Fireside Room, 
or if we prefer to worship alone there is 
the quiet beauty of Danforth Chapel 





>n Sunday night we meet at Union Church for C.E. 
terea College is "a nondenomi national school with Christian 
deals" ... its opportunities for worship show that 





then there are vesper hours that we spend 
in the beloved Tabernacle of THE BEREA 
PLAYERS . . . 



we are proud to become members of the 
national dramatic honor societies . . . 



we join Alpha Psi Omega for acting and 
Tau Delta Tau for stagecraft (or perhaps 
both if we are ambitious) 



... if we're in high school we hope to be- 
come a Thespian 






THE IMAGINARY INVALID, 

LADIES IN RETIREMENT, 

AND THE CRADLE SONG — this years major shows . . . 

one acts every week to keep us busy with make-up, poster paint, flat washings, learning 

lines, and directing 





we Bereans like athletics, too . . . remember 
those years of goldthwait . . . there's danc- 
ing now, and badminton has always been 
a good game . . . 



playing basketball is much more exciting 
than just watching, and it's loads of fun to 
break a record in track (this year's team 
rated second in Cross Country at Louis- 
ville ) . . . 



our coaches have their job to build health and pleasure through 



physical exercise 






i <* i 




^-se\ 






In Photography Club we find a chance to 
cultivate a wonderful hobby which may 
someday become more than a hobby . . 



the graceful folk dances live in Country 
Dancers . . . we look forward to the Moun- 
tain folk festival in the spring . . . 



Alpha Zeta Literary society begins its year 
with a colorful initiation and a torchlit 
pajama parade and continues with fiery 
debates . . . 



in Rural Life Club we learn to carry back 
to our communities some of the oppor- 
tunities we find in Berea . . . 




jodhpurs, slacks, overalls, dungarees, all hiking one Sunday afternoon down the road toward the 
pinnacles . . . climbing around Indian Fort . . . listening to vespers . . . watching the sun set 
behind the hills as the women's glee club sang taps . . . shoving down the mountain for supper 
. . . hiking home in the moonlight to hot showers . . . and bed 



Lowly and humbled we slump before you, amazed and appalled by the task we undertook. It 
didn't take long to learn which room was the Chimes office, but some of the other knowledge 
came harder — galleys, halftones, metrolite, let come, burnish it, square the thing, how many 
'picies' to a page — well, you'll never know and neither will we. 



The pictures of the staff of the '44 Chimes are not all on this page; you'll have to look 
through the book. The pictures were taken, developed, and printed by Bill Steinberger, 
Miss Crabb, Seamen Murphy, Gibbs, Cowen, and Rosenthal, Mr. Walters, Clyde Flannery, 
and you snapshot-shooters. Atchley, Chafin, Sherman, and Clancy rounded out the picture 
business and credit goes to all of them for long hours of patience and work. 



Copy came from the pens, pencils, and typewriters of B. J. Knotts, Virginia Osborne, Mary 
Butler, Speck and Adler. It was proofread by Loree, Covilli, by Eldred and Frances and 
Lenore. 



The business angle was handled by Annabel Brake, and that gal did solid work on the rest 
of the book, too. Then there was June working on circulation, "Dutch" running off to John 
and Oilier, six-foot Baas shooing in ads, Nancy with her squirrels; the help of Argie, Lucille, 
rounders, identifiers, and numerous other interested faculty and students of our staff. 
We thank you . . . every one. 



The Editor 



Eva Nell Whitaker, Editor Annabel Brake, Business Manager 



SENIOR BIOGRAPHIES 



ALTIZER, ADA LILLIAN — PAF 2,3,4; Sec- 
Treas. 4; Pan American 2,3,4. 

ANDERS, AGNES — YWCA 1,2,3,4; CE 2,3; 
Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club; Berea 
Players 3. 

ARMFIELD, EVA ANN— YWCA 1,2; Berea Play- 
ers 3,4. 

ATCHLEY, MARGARET LEIGH — Harmonia 1,2 
Union Church Choir 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3 
Treas. 3; Home Ec Club 3,4; UD Senate 4 
Board of Governors 4; Berea Players 1 ,2,3 
Danforth Chapel Choir 1,2; LD Social Com- 
mittee 1 ; UD Association of Women, Pres. 4; 
Chimes Staff 4; Modern Dance 3; Project 
Committee Chairman 1; WHO'S WHO IN 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

ARLEDGE, FRED— Ag Union 1; Winner of Fresh- 
man-Sophomore Judging Contest. 

BARR, EVELYN— Harmonia 2,3,4; YWCA 1,2,3,4, 
Cabinet 4; Home Ec Club 3,4, Treas. 3; 
PAF 3,4, WAA 1,2,3; WAA Board 2; Pi 
Alpha 3,4; Board of Governors 3,4, Pres. 4; 
Berea Players 3; Outlying Rural Work 3; 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 
AND COLLEGES. 

BARNETT, NANCY— Berea Players 3; PAF 1; 
YWCA 1. 

BECK, OLGA— YWCA 1,2,3,4; Photo Club 3; Out- 
ing Club 3, Sec. 3, Basketball 2,3; Harmonia, 
1; Council of Association of UD women 3, 
Sec. 3. 

BELL, BERTHA— YWCA 1; Berea Players 1,2,3,4; 
Vanguards 3; Wallpaper Staff 4; PAF 1,2,3,4, 
Pres. 4, German Club 3; Delta Phi Alpha 3,4. 

BELL, HELEN— YWCA 3,4; Education Club 4; 
French Club 4. 

BLACKBURN, EVADNA MITCHELL — Berea 
Players 3,4; WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

BOOHER, LURINE— YWCA 1; CE 1,2,3,4; Home 
Ec Club 3,4; Berea Players 2; Basketball 
1,2,3,4. 



BRADY, VERNA MAE— YWCA 1,2,3,4; Outlying 
Sunday School Work 1 ,2; Berea Players 3,4; 
Student Cooperative 1,2,3; Westervelt Shop 
1,2,3. 

BRAKE, ANNABEL— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; LD 
Senate 2; Freshman Class Sec; Institutional 
Social Committee 4; Senior Class Pres. 4; 
YWCA 1,2,3,4; Chimes Staff, Business Man- 
ager 4, Y Guide Business Manager 4; WAA 
1,2,3; Modern Dance 3; WHO'S WHO IN 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COL- 
LEGES. 

BROWN, WANDA EVELYN— Berea Players 1 ; 
Harmonia 2; Life Saving 2,3,4; Pan American 
3; French Club 1; YWCA 2. 

BUCKLES, VIVIAN LEE — Berea Players 1,2 
YWCA 1,2,3; PAF 1,2,3,4, Vice-pres. 4 
Pan American League 3,4; Vanguards 4 
Modern Dance 2,3; Pi Gamma Mu 4. 

BURTON, EDSEL H — Pi Alpha 3; YMCA 4. 



BUTLER, MARY— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; YWCA 
1,2,3,4; Social Committee 1,2; Tau Kappa 
Alpha 2,3; Twenty Writers 4; Board of 
Governors 3, Sec. 3; Wallpaper Staff 4 
French Club 1 ; PAF 3; Union Church Choir 4 
Council of UD Association of Women 4 
Chimes Staff 4. 

CAMPBELL, REVA EDITH— YWCA 1,5; WAA 3; 
Berea Players 4; Home Ec Club 4,5, Sec. 5; 
Ag-Home Ec. Club 4. 



CARSON, KATHERINE 
YWCA 3. 



— Berea Players 3,4; 



CHANDLER, DOROTHY ALICE— Berea Players 4; 
Home Ec Club 3,4; CE 1,2,3,4; Ag-Home Ec 
Club 3; YWCA 3,4; Basketball 1,2,3,4; 
WAA 1,2,3,4. 

CLARK, EDMONIA ELLA— Berea Players 1; Har- 
monia 1,2,4; LD Senate 1; Ag-Home Ec Club 
3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4; Modern Dance 2; 
CE. 1,2. 

COATES, MARY ELIZABETH— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Cabinet 3,4; UD Senate 3; Home Ec Club 
3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; Harmonia 2; Mod- 
ern Dance 2. 



CROUSER, JEAN— CE 3,4,5, Treas. 5; Berea 
Players 3,5; YWCA 1,2; Home Ec Club 3,5; 
Ag-Home Ec Club 3,4. 

CROUSER, LENORE— CE 3,4, Berea Players 3,4; 
Ag-Home Ec Club 3; Home Ec Club 4; Har- 
monia 4. 

DAVIS, BENJAMIN H. — Pan American League 3; 
Berea Players 3,4; YMCA 4; Country Dancers 
3,4; Track 1. 

DENHAM, JOHN— Band 1,2; Orchestra 2,3,4. 

DOUGLAS, ELIZABETH — Union Church Choir 
3,4; Varsity Women's Glee Club 3,4; YWCA 
3; Royal Collegians 3; Berea Players 4; 
Basketball 3,4; Outlying Sunday School 
Work 3 

EDWARDS, VELMA ERNESTINE— Berea Players 
3,4; Harmonic 4, YWCA 3,4; Pi Alpha 4; 
French Club 4. 

EDWARDS, ELLA FLORENCE— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 1,2; Harmonia 2,3,4; Home Ec. 
Club 4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3. 

ELDER, IDA— YWCA 3,4; Harmonia 4; Berea 
Players 4; Home Ec Club 4; PAF 4. 

FIELD, NANCY— Varsity Women's Glee Club 3,4, 
Pres. 4; Harmonia 3,4; Chimes Staff 4; 
Wallpaper Staff 4. 

FITZPATRICK, IMOGENE MAE — Harmonia 
1,2,3,4; Berea Players 1; YWCA 1,2,3; 
Modern Dance 2, Pi Gamma Mu 3,4. 

FLANNERY, CLYDE CECIL— YMCA 1,2,3,4, Pres. 
3,4; Debate 3; UD Senate 4; UD Board of 
Governors 4; WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN 
UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

FLETCHER, PAUL— YMCA 1,2,3,4. 

FOLEY, HAZEL— Home Ec Club 3,4, Pres. 4; Ag- 
Home Ec Club 3, Vice-pres. 3; YWCA 2,3. 

FOX, ALICE CLAYBORNE — Basketball 1,2,3, 
Captain 1,2,3; Modern Dance 2,3; WAA 
Pres 3; Ag-Home Ec Club 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3; 
Berea Players 1 ; Harmonia 4; Home Ec Club 
3,4. 

FREEMAN, MADGE ELAINE— Education Club 4; 
Berea Players 3,4; PAF 4; Harmonia 4; 
YWCA 4. 



GILLIAM, MARJORIE— Berea Players 1,4, CE 1,2, 
Basketball 1,2,3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag- 
Home Ec Club 3. 

GOFORTH, DOROTHY ROSALYN— Home Ec Club 
4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; YWCA 3,4, UD 
Women's Association 4; Social Committee 
Chairman 4; UD Social Committee 4. 

HATCHETTE, MARY HAZEL— YWCA 3,4; Berea 
Players 3,4; PAF 4, French Club 4. 

HAYS, EARL THOMAS, JR. — Band 1,2. 

HENDERSON, FRANCES RUTH— Berea Players 
3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3, 
UD Women's Association 3; Modern Dance 
3; Danforth Creative Prize Winner 3; PAF 4. 

HILLMAN, ELLEN ELIZABETH — Berea Players 
3,4; YWCA 3,4, Vanguards 4, Class Sec. 4. 

HORNE, MARIE ELIZABETH — UD Senate 3,4, 
Sec. 3,4; Berea Players 1,2.3, Home Ec. Club 
3,4, Vice-pres. 4, Ag-Home Ec Club 3; Out- 
ing Club 2,3; Photography Club 1 ,2. 



HOLLYFIELD, GRACE GERTRUDE- 
PAF 4, Berea Players 4. 



-YWCA 3,4; 



HUBBARD, JOHN W— Ag. Union 1,2,3,4; Ag- 
Home Ec Club 3,4; YMCA 1,3,4; Intramural 
Basketball 1,2,3, Intramural Football 1,2,3; 
Varsity Track 3. 

HUBBARD, THOMAS PLEASANT, JR.— Swimming 
1,2; UD Senate 3,4; Sigma Pi Sigma 3,4, Sec. 
4; YMCA 1,2,3,4; Pi Alpha 2,3,4; Berea 
Players 3,4; Photography Club 1; UD Social 
Committee 4. 

KEEN, KATHARINE F. — YWCA 1,2,3,4, Home 
Ec Club 3,4; UD Women's Association 3; 
WAA 1,2,3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; Modern 
Dance 2; Class Treas. 4. 

KEEN, POLLY MARIE— Harmonia 1; Home Ec 
Club 4; CE 1,2,3, Cabinet 3; Berea Players 
2,3,4; Outing Club 2,3; Ag-Home Ec. Club 3; 
Basketball 1,3; Modern Dance 3. 

KNOTTS, BETTY JO— Delta Phi Alpha 3,4; 
French Club 1 ; Berea Players 1 ,2; Harmonia 
3; Twenty Writers 3, Sec. 3; LD Social Com- 
mittee 1; Institutional Social Committee 4; 
UD Board of Governors 4, Sec. 4; Life Saving 
2; Modern Dance 2,3; Chairman Project Com- 
mittee 2. 



KUYKENDALL, NANCY ELIZABETH 
1,4; Berea Players 1,3,4. 



YWCA 



LANKFORD, ANN— Harmonia 1,2; YWCA 3,4; 
WAA 1,2,3,4, Treas. 2, Vice-pres. 3; Life 
Saving 1 ; Country Dancers 4; Folk Club 4. 

LOFTIS, MONNA ELOISE — Harmonia 2,3,4; 
Berea Players 1 ,2,4; Home Ec Club 4; Outing 
Club 3; Basketball 2; YWCA 1,2,3,4. 

MOORE, DEWEY — CE 2; YMCA 2,3,4; Pi Alpha 
3,4; Sigma Pi Sigma 3,4, Treas. 4. 

MORTON, JUNE ROSEBUD— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 2,3,4; PAF 2,4; UD Women's 
Council 3; LD Social Committee 2; Delta Phi 
Alpha 3,4; German Club 1,2; Modern Dance 
2; Co-op 3; Chimes Staff 4. 

MUNCY, MARY LOUISE— LD Glee Club 1,2 
Union Church Choir 1,2; Berea Players 3,4 
Harmonia 1,2; Westervelt 2,3,4; CE 2 
Varsity Women's Glee Club 3,4. 

NESTOR, BILLIE MARIE— Berea Players 1,2,3,4, 
Vice-pres. 4; YWCA 1,2,3, Vice-pres. 3; 
Bird Club 2. 

NICKELS, MARGARET RUTH — Wallpaper Staff 
2,3; Co-op 1,2; Berea Players 3,4; Wester- 
velt 1,2,3,4; WAA 2; YWCA 4; Folk Club 2. 

NOSS, MARGARET GEISSINGER— YWCA 1,2,3,4, 
Cabinet 3; Home Ec Club 3,4; Basketball 
1,2,4; Life Saving 2; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; 
LD Senate 2. 

O'DANIEL, SARAH LEE— Ballad Singers 2,3; LD 
Glee Club 1 ; Education Club 3,4; Harmonia 
1; Berea Players 1; YWCA 1,2; Bird Club 3. 

ORTH, ESTHER— Berea Players 1,3,4; Bird Club 
1,2,3,4, Sec. 2,3, Pres. 4; Delta Phi Alpha 
3,4; Pi Alpha 3,4, Pres. 4, YWCA 3,4. 

OSBORNE, VIRGINIA L— Berea Players 2,3,4; 
Twenty Writers 2,3,4, Pres. 4; Wallpaper 
Staff 2,3,4, Editor 3,4; PAF 4; Chimes Staff 
4; French Club 2; YWCA 2,3,4. 



PEASLEE, RUTH— YWCA 1,2,3,4, Sec. 2, Pres. 3; 
Berea Players 2,3,4; Harmonia 1,2; Van- 
guards 3; UD Senate 3; Delta Phi Alpha 3,4; 
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES 
AND COLLEGES. 



PENNINGTON, ELDRED— YWCA 1,2; Basketball 
1,2.3,4; Berea Players 2,3,4; Education Club 
3,4; WAA 2,3,4. 

POWELL, AGNES EVELYN— YWCA 3,4, Cabinet 
3,4; Home Ec Club 3,4; Vanguards 3; Berea 
Plovers 3,4; PAF 4; Harmonia 4. 

REBER, ALTA MAE DAVIS— Berea Players 1,2; 
Home Ec Club 3,4; German Club 1; YWCA 

1,2 

REBER, ELWOOD F. — UD Senate 4; Berea Players 
1; FOR 2,3,4; Intramural Football 3. 

SHUPE, MARYANNA— CE 1,2,3, Treas. 3; YWCA 
3.4; Berea Players 3,4; Harmonia 1,2; Ag- 
Home Ec Club 3, Home Ec Club 4; PAF 4; 
Outlying Work 2,3. 

SINCLAIRE, LOREE ELIZABETH— YWCA 1,2,3,4, 
Cabinet 2,3,4; French Club 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3, 
Program Chairman 4; Berea Players 1,2,3,4, 
Sec. 4; WAA 1,2,3; Harmonia 1; Bird Club 
3,4; LD Social Committee 1,2; Project Com- 
mittee 4; Vanguards 3; PAF 4; Tau Delta 
Tau 4, Sec. 4; Women's House Government 
3; Wallpaper Staff 4; Chimes Staff 4; Ora- 
torical Contest 2. 

SMITH, RUBY LEE— CE 1,2; Bird Club 3, Vice- 
pres. 3; Berea Players 3, Harmonia 2,3,4; 
Home Ec Club 4; Danforth Chapel Choir 1,2; 
Union Church Choir 1,2; Basketball 2,3. 

STEINBERGER, CLARENCE H. — Twenty Writers 
1,2; YMCA 1,2,4, Cabinet 4; Student Co-op 
2,3; Vanguards 1,2,3,4; Men's Glee Club 
1,2,3; Phi Delta 2,3; Berea Players 4; Chimes 
Staff 4; Country Dancers 4; UD Board of 
Governors 4, Vice-pres. 4; UD Men's Hall 
Union 4, Chairman 4; UD Senate 4. 

STEINBERGER, WILLIAM W. — Photography 
Club 1,2; LD Glee Club 1; Bird Club 2,3,4; 
YMCA 1,3,4; Sigma Pi Sigma 3,4, Sec. 3, 
Pres. 4; Men's Glee Club 2.3, Sec. -Treas. 3; 
Pi Alpha 3,4, Vice-Pres. 4; Chimes Staff 4; 
Country Dancers 4; UD Senate 4, UD Board 
of Governors 4. 

STEWART, JEAN DODSON— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Class Vice-Pres. 4; Berea Players 1 ; Home Ec 
Club 4; Basketball 2; Harmonia 4. 



THOMAS, LUELLA RUTH— YWCA 1,2,3,4; PAF 
2,3,4; Vanguards 3,4, Chairman 4, Berea 
Players 2,3,4; Harmonia 1 ; Union Church 
Choir 2,4. 

THOMSON, NORA LOU— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; 
WAA 3, YWCA 1,2,3,4; Outing Club 2,3; 
Vanguards 3,4. 



12TH GRADE BIOCRAPHIES 

ABNEY, DELIA -Girl Reserves 2; YWA 3; YWCA 

3,4 

ACKER, BETTY— Berea Players 2; Glee Club 1. 

ADKINS, LORA ANNETTE— Girl Reserve 1,2, De- 
votional Chairman 1, Vice-pres. 2; Prayer 
Group 2,3,4; YWCA 3,4, CE 3. 



TRUMBO, DOROTHY L — German Club 1 ; YWCA 
2,3,4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; Home Ec Club 
3,4; PAF 4. 

WALTERS, LETTA— Berea Players 4; Home Ec 
Club 3,4, Sec. 4; Ag-Home Ec Club 3; YWCA 
1,2,4; Harmonia 2,3,4; Modern Dance 2,3. 

WARHOLM, NELL ELIZABETH— YWCA 1,2,3,4; 
Berea Players 1,2,3; Bird Club 2; PAF 2,3,4; 
Pan American League 3; Modern Dance 2,3. 

WASHBURN, BENJAMIN— YMCA 3. 

WATKINS, MARIE— YWCA 3,4; PAF 4; Pan 
American League 3; Vanguards 3. 

WHITAKER, EVA NELL— Harmonia 1; Berea 
Players 1,2,3,4, Pres. 4; Women's Glee Club 
1,3, Trio 3; Chimes Staff 4, Editor 4; Union 
Church Choir 2,3; UD Senate 4; LD Social 
Committee 1 ; Alpha Psi Omega 4; Tau Delta 
Tau 4; Twenty Writers 4; WHO'S WHO IN 
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COL- 
LEGES. 

WHITMAN, LENORE LEE— Berea Players 1,2,3,4; 
Harmonia 1,2,3; Vanguards 3,4; LD Senate 
1,2; LD Social Committee 1,2; Chimes Staff 
3,4; YWCA 1,2,3,4; PAF 3,4; Ag-Home Ec 
Club 2,3; Modern Dance 2,3; Tau Delta Tau 
4; UD Social Committee 3,4; Westervelt 4; 
Pi Gamma Mu 3,4; WHO'S WHO IN AMER- 
ICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 

WILSON, FRIEDA BEGLEY— Berea Players 3. 

WILSON, WILMA FRANCES— Harmonia 1,2; 
Women's Glee Club 2,3,4; LD Glee Club 1. 

WYATT, ROBERT CAM— YMCA 2,3,4; CE 2; Ag. 
Union 1,2,3,4, Sec. 3. 



BENT, ELEANOR McVAY— Berea Players 2,3,4; 
CE 4, Glee Club 1; Union Church Choir 
1,2.3,4; LD Senate 3. 

BIGGERSTAFF, LEWIS— Swimming 1,2,3; Inter- 
mural Basketball and Speedball Winning 
Team 2,3; Basketball 4. 

BLAIR, NILA MAE— YWCA 3; LD Senate 2,3, 
Basketball 2. 

BUCHANAN, FRANCES— Band 1. 

BURTON, SALLY— Girl Reserve 1; Rural Life 
Club 4. 

CADY, EUGENE LYMAN— Berea Players 1,2, 
Technical Director 2; Union Church Choir 2; 

YMCA 2, Royal Collegians 1. 

CAINS, JAMES— YMCA 4; AZ 4. 

CAMPBELL, RUBY— Rural Life Club 4. 

CAUDILL, LIDA— Berea Players 3; Basketball 3; 
YWCA 3. 

CLARK, JESSIE— Berea Players 1. 

CRIPPEN, ROBERT D— Berea Players 3; YMCA 
1,2,3,4; Basketball 3. 



DANIELS, ESTELLE— 

EDWARDS, FRANCES— YWCA 
ship Group 1 . 



World Fellow- 



ELLISON, WILMA — YWCA 1,2,3; Rural Life Club 
2,3; Folk Club 2; CE 1,2. 

EMERSON, DOROTHY JEAN— YWCA, Cabinet 1. 

HAMBLIN, MONA— Girl Reserve 12 Cabinet 2: 
Rural Life Club 4: CE 3. 

HARDY, JEANNE E— Glee Club 1,2,3; Girl Re- 
serves 1,2; YWCA 3 4. 



HESSELGESSER, JAMES M. — Berea Players 2; 
YMCA 3; Glee Club 1; Hi-Y 1. 

HOGAN, ARLETT A— Prayer Group 3,4; YWCA 
3,4. 

HOOKER, GERRY — Berea Players 3,4; House 
Council 4; Girl Reserve, Cabinet 2. 

HYMER, GENEVA KATHLENE— Berea Players 

3,4 

JENNINGS, ARTIE ANN— Girl Reserve 1; Basket- 
Ball 2,3,4; Berea Players 3; YWCA 3. 

JONES, FAIRIE— Glee Club 1. 

KEYSER, A. CHARLES— Union Church Choir 1; 
YMCA 2; Band 1 . 

KILBOURNE, SUE MARIE— Chairman of Social 
Committee 3; Union Church Choir 1 . 

KRANOLD, JOHANNA— Harmonia 4; YWCA 4. 

LAMBERT, DEAN WARREN— Orchestra 3,4; Band 
3,4; Glee Club 3. 

LANG, DeKERN— YMCA 4. 

LAPSLEY, ANNA MARY— CE 3,4; Rural Life Club 
3,4. 

LITTLE, CHARLES STRATTON— YMCA 3,4; In- 
termural Basketball 3; Forensics 3; Rural 
Life 3,4; Country Dancers 4; LD Senate 3. 



LOCKHART, JOYCE— Harmonia 1 
YWCA 1 : CE 1 . 



Choir 1 



LUCAS, INEZ- 
MITCHELL, JACK R— YMCA 1; Harmonia 1. 

MORGAN, ELEANOR— Berea Players 2,3,4; Glee 
Club 1; Union Church Choir 1,2,3; Thespians 
3,4; Danforth Chapel Choir 3,4. 

MULLINS, GENEVA— Berea Players 3; Basketball 
3; YWCA 3. 



McWILLIAMS, MELBA— Band 2,3,4; Berea Play- 
ers 3,4; CE 3,4. 

REFO, ALICE- 
REYNOLDS, ELLEN — Berea Players 4; Basketball 
1,2,3,4; CE 4. 

RIDLEHOOVER, JOAN — Berea Players 1,2; Union 
Church Choir 1 . 

ROPER, JOSEPHINE— Berea Players 1,2; Sec- 
ondary Forensics 2; Glee Club 1 ,2. 

RUTH, EARL— Hi-Y 2,3; Baseball 1,2,3; Basket- 
ball 2; Intramural Champions 3. 

RYAN, GLEMA — Berea Players 2. 

SMITH, KENDRIC— Band 1,2; Orchestra 2; 
YMCA 2; Union Church Choir 2; Berea Play- 
ers 1 ,2; LD Senate 1 ,2; Chimes 2. 

SMITH, RUTH MARY — Union Church Choir 
1,2,3,4; Country Dancers 1,2,3,4; Glee Club 
1; Berea Players 3,4; Thespians 3,4; 
Forensics 3; Winner in Forensics Finals of 
Prose Literature Division in High School 
Speech Festival of Kentucky. 

STEWART, PAT— Berea Players 1,2. 

SUITER.. BETTY CAROLYN— CE 3, Treas. 3; 
Union Church Choir 3; Berea Players 4. 

THOMAS MARY BETH — Berea Players 1 . 

THORNE, MAGGIE — Girl Reserve 1,2; YWCA 3. 

TROUTMAN, KATHY— Berea Players 3; Basket- 
ball 2,3. 

VODOLA, ELIZABETH— Union Church Choir 4; 
Harmonia 4. 

WEEKES, ELEANOR— Berea Players 4; Union 
Church Choir 1,2,3; Orchestra 1,2,3; Glee 
Club 1 ; Forensics 2,3,4; CE 4; Country 
Dancers 1,2; LD Senate 4; Harmonia 3. 



McCOUN, LILLIAN LOUISE- 



WILLIAMS, DAVID, JR.— Band 4. 




our advertisers 



when you buy, remember these friends of Berea. 
friends of the Chimes . . . 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF A 



FRIEND 



for that quick breakfast before your 7:30 class, 
make it — 



'coffee 'n doughnuts 



/ / 



THE DOUGHNUT CORPORATION 

393 Seventh Avenue 
New York City 



WHEELERS 



Kentucky's finest furniture store 



Lexington, Kentucky 




DRAPER MEMORIAL 



Be Better Fitted 
in 

BAYNHAM'S 

Shoes of Distinction 

135 E. Main Street 
Lexington, Kentucky 



Compliments of 

BRYAN-HUNT CO. 

Incorporated 

Lexington, Kentucky 




■"■&■ 



LITTLE MAMA'S 



Compliments of 
BEREA DRY CLEANERS 

E. L. EDWARDS, Prop. 

Cleaning — Pressing — Tailoring 

Special Attention to Student 

Work 

Short St. Phone 328 



Compliments of 

THE BEREA BANK 
AND TRUST CO. 




Short Street 



A. F. SCRUGGS 



Insurance Agency 



Berea, Ky. 




The ch : ef engineer must use quality products; 
for thai reason Mr. George Dick, chief engineer 
of Berea College, uses products made by 

THE JOHNSON ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



J^oons. -JcujExn ^pijk ^kofi 



Products of Student Industries 



Located on the Corner of Main Street 



Opposite Union Church 



Under Berec College Management — Berea, Kentucky 



For all occasions, the year round . 
"Say It With Flowers" 

From 

RICHMOND GREEN HOUSES 
J. P. Reichspfarr 

Phone 838 



Richmond 



Kentucky 



Compliments of 
a friend 



Compliments of the 

MIAMI MARGARINE 
COMPANY 



Motion Picture 
Entertainment 

BEREA THEATER 



Compliments of 



VILAS-MAGES COMPANY 



Chicago 
Illinois 




500 Varieties 



MONARCH FINER FOODS 




'Compliments of a friend' 



«*~<s 



^~x, 



,«/* 



TO A 

SWELL CLASS 

AND A 

GREAT SCHOOL 

PAPER PACKAGE COMPANY 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



X^ '^V^ ' \ x /' ' ^^~ 



> 




THE CHIMES 



of 1944 has been produced by skilled craftsmen of the 



Berea College Press 

with the help of many student employees. 
Ever since 1930 the CHIMES has been produced annually by this same 



Printing House 



INSIST ON 

MAGNOLIA MEAT PRODUCTS 

FROM 

THE— EMMART— PACKING— COMPANY 

Louisville 
Kentucky 



TO BEREA .... 

Our sincere appreciation for the many years 
of pleasant associations we have enjoyed as sup- 
pliers of Boxes for Berea Beaten Biscuits and other 
Bakery Products. 

The GARDNER-RICHARDSON Co. 
Middletown, Ohio 

Manufacturers of Folding 
Cartons — and Displays 



Compliments of 

MADISON SOUTHERN 

NATIONAL BANK 

AND TRUST CO. 

Member of the Federal Deposit Corp. 

Richmond, Kentucky 



"The thorns from which we make 
B. C. N. 

phonograph needles come from Burma, and are 
now unobtainable; but we expect a shipment 
SOON." 

READ & HARDING NEW YORK, N.Y. 



John F. Dean 



Edward L. Roberts 



JOHN F. DEAN AGENCY 
Insurance 

Berea Bank & Trust Co. Bldg. 
Phone 35 Berea < Kentucky 







One of the oldest log schoolhouses still in use, it is the scene of the 
"Renfro Valley Gatherin'," heard every Sunday morning at 8:15 over 
WHAS, Louisville, Kentucky, and the CBS Southern Network. 
This program, sponsored by Ballard and Ballard, aims at the expansion 
and perpetuation of a community meeting of many years standing in 
the Renfro Valley Settlement — The Renfro Valley Gatherin'. 



Our Merchandise 

Is Sold At 
The College Store 



SIMON ADES SONS CO. 



Louisville, Kentucky 




FINE PAPER SPECIALTIES 
BETTY BRITE 

White Doilies, Tinted Doilies, Place Mats, Shelf 
Papers, Baking Cups 

AMERICAN 

Drinking Cups, Porcell Cups, Napkins, Ramekins, 
Tray Covers, Candy Box Findings 



AMERICAN LACE PAPER CO. 

Milwaukee 12, Wis. 



MJWR 



J 



i -i i 



"Meet you at T. P's 



"Beautiful Shoes" 
for Women 

BROWN'S BOOTERIE 

138 W. Main St. 
Lexington, Kentucky 

Also Louisville, Ky., Knoxville, Tenn., 
and Chattanooga, Tenn. 



AMERICAN COTTON 
PRODUCTS CO. 



ANYTHING 
MADE OF COTTON 



2516 SOUTH DAMEN AVE. 
CHICAGO - ILLINOIS 



Compliments of 



BEREA NATIONAL BANK 



Compliments of 



BOONE TAVERN 



BARBER SHOP 



Surgical Supplies 



The Crocker-Fels Company 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Compliments of 



BEREA MOTOR CO. 



Berea, Kentucky 



Compliments 
of 

OWEN McKEE 
THE LADIES' STORE 

Richmond, Kentucky 



Eat here anytime 

BLUE GRASS HOTEL & CAFE 
"Home of good food" 
Rooms & Apartments 

3erea, Ky. Phone 104 



Compliments of 



Berea 5c to $1.00 Store 



E. T. HAYS & SONS 



Grade "A" Milk 



West End 



Phone 32 




TUXEDO WITH EGO 

by "Carolyn" 

Soft Blue, 100 per cent Wove Fabric 
Furred with a handsome skunk tuxedo! 

$1 19.00 plus tax 

B. B. SMITH & CO., INC. 

Lexington, Kentucky 



Chestnut 



E. E. GABBARD 

"Eat Here or We 
Both Starve" 



Open 24 Hours 



CARTER'S COLLEGE INN 



"Best Coffee In Town" 



Sandwiches & Short Orders 



Short Street 



CONCRETE BUILDING BLOCK 

and 

CONCRETE BUILDING TILE 

Lexington Concrete Products Co. 

Lexington 
Kentucky 



PLUMBER'S SUPPLY COMPANY 

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 

Plumbing — Heating — Mill Supplies 

Kohler Plumbing Fixtures — - Weil McLain Heating 



UNUSUAL GIFTS 



• • • 







• BY BEREA COLLEGE 
STUDENT INDUSTRIES 
AT BEREA, KENTUCKY 




BBREA 
COLLEGE 

STUDENT 
.INDUSTRIES 

BEREA 
K.Y. 



Compliments of 



ADES-LEXINGTON DRY GOODS CO. 



249-255 E. Main Street 



Lexington, Kentucky 



T 
p 

r A Means of Buying through a 

J Inc. Single Source 

Theatre Production Service 

All Supplies and Equipment for the Theatre 

1430 Broadway Write for Catalogue 

New York City 



CRACKER JACK & 
P. D. Q. FEEDS 

Give "Cracker Jack" Results "P.D.Q." 

FERNCLIFF FEED & GRAIN CO. 

Incorporated 

Louisville, Ky. Ask Your Dealer 



Food Products of Quality 



Pickles, Preserves, Jams, Jellies 



and Fruit Butters 



LUTZ & SCHRAMM INC. 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Compliments 

of 

LACQUER SPECIALTIES, Inc. 

Newark, New Jersey 



SOUTH KENTUCKY PIPE 
LINE CO. 

High grade refined petroleum 
products 

Somerset, Ky. 



Compliments 
of 

ZARINC'S MILL 

Use Zaring's Patent Flour 



Richmond 



Kentucky 



Compliments of 

STATE BANK AND 
TRUST CO. 

Members of the Federal Deposit Corp. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Richmond, Kentucky 




KRIM-KO COMPANY 



Itoottp aJaurru 



Compliments of 

Krim-Ko Chocolate 
Flavored Drink 



A PRIVATE HOTEL WITH ALL MODERN 



CONVENIENCES 



A REAL HOME ATMOSPHERE 



Chicago, III. 



Managed and Controlled by Berea College 



Compliments 
of 

ASHLAND HOME TELEPHONE COMPANY 
Inc. 

Serving Forty Kentucky Communities 



Compliments 

of 

RIVERS' SHOE SHOP 



Short St. 



Phone 3 1 2 



ELLIOTT COMPANY 

Manufacturers of power plant equipment, including steam turbines, 
turbine-generators, motors and generators, deaerators and feedwater heaters, 
condensers, steam jet ejectors, desuperheaters, strainers, tube celaners, su- 
per chargers for Diesel engines, etc. 

Plants in 
JEANNETTE, PA.,. RIDGWAY, PA., and SPRINGFIELD, OHIO 



We Are Headquarters For 

GOOD LUMBER 



Mahogany — White Pine — Cherry 

Birch — Poplar — Red Gum — Maple 

White Oak — Red Oak — Magnolia 

Boat Material — Cypress 

Kiln Dried Stock For Immediate Service 

We Will Appreciate Your Inquiries 

Charles F. Shiels & Co. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



compliments of a friend 



IT R-J . 5RTER-HOORE PC 

— ^ORTER-MOORE 
PQRTER-MOQI 




I - 



E PORT' "'" - PORTER-MOORE PORTER-I'OORE 



Stationers 



THE JENNER COMPANY 
( Incorporated) 



Louisville, Kentucky 



Engravers 



PADAWER & CO. 

Filling Materials 

24 Stone Street 

New York 4, N. Y. 



Compliments of 



BLACK BROS. BUS LINES 



Whether - 



It's Badminton or Tennis 



JlJi If //At .", 



Is the Gut of Champions 



'Call us for Special Trips" 



Phone 210 



or 



Nearest Bus Station 



Richmond, Kentucky 



CALUMET 

TEA & COFFEEE 

COMPANY 

Chicago 



BUY WAR BONDS FIRST! 



IF YOU MUST HAVE FURNITURE— THEN SEE 



SLEEPY-HEAD HOUSE 



'The South's Most Complete Factory-To-You Furniture Store" 



Retail Division of Southern Bedding Co., Incorporated 



LEXINGTON, KY. 



"We Work That You May Sleep" 



MID-WEST THEATRE SUPPLY CO., INC. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Everything for the Theatre 




A tribute to 

fashion-wise students 

who know that 

it's smart to 

shop fashion-right 




OFFICE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, INC. 

COMPLETE OFFICE OUTFITTERS 

Also Complete Line of 

SCHOOL FURNITURE AND SUPPLIES 

1 17-125 South Fourth 

Wabash 5161 Louisville, Ky. 

Branch Store 

128 West Short Street 

Phone 3372 Lexington, Ky. 



PAREN- INDEX SYSTEM of complete name index- 
ing SI. 00. Description of system sent on request 
without charge. Published by the author, Miss 
A. L. D. Moore, 149 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 



Compliments of a friend 



CARRY ON! 

We, who work on the home front as part of America's great manufacturing 
system, have a dual goal ... to supply our Army and Navy with the materials 
of war ... to supply our country's workers with essential civilian needs. 

We pledge ourselves to carry on faithfully in this job of winning the final 
victory! 

SHERMAN PAPER PRODUCTS CORPORATION 

Newton Upper Falls, Massachusetts 

Los Angeles, California 
Branches in New York and Chicago 

Manufacturers of "Economy-Plus" paper products for baking and packag- 
ing . . . Corroflex and V-Lines for packing war materials. 



Congratulations to the Graduation Class 



Lee Clay Products Co. 



Manufacturers of 



Septic Tanks 

Architectural Chimney Tops 

Salt Glazed Sewer Pipe 



Fire Brick and Grate Backs 
Fire Clay Flue Linings 
Agricultural Drain Tile 



Your Farm Department Uses Our Drain Tiles and Sewer Pipe 



CLEARFIELD 



ROWAN COUNTY 



KENTUCKY 



STOVES AND RANGES 



RESTAURANT 

RANGES 
GAS GRIDDLES 



FOR COAL, WOOD 

GAS AND OIL 

ALSO BOTTLED GAS 



For Schools — Colleges 
Restaurants — etc. 




DOMESTIC 
STOVES 



CANNON HEATERS 

HOT BLAST HEATERS 

SCHOOL ROOM HEATERS 



Buy Wood and Coal Heaters 

to Save Oil and Supplement 

Present Equipment 



ALL SALES SUBJECT TO LIMITATION AND RATIONING ORDERS 

HART MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



LOUISVILLE 



KENTUCKY 



Compliments of . . 



CRANE COMPANY 




Compliments of friends 



MARINO BROS. 

WHOLESALE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

IRVINE STREET 

RICHMOND, KENTUCKY 



Compliments of 

CENTRAL FRANKLIN 
PROCESS CO. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Yarn Dvers and Colored Yarns. 



JOHN SCHWARZ 

Fine Footwear 

754 & 756 McMillian St. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 




Modern 
Beauty Salon 



Short Street 



Lowe Brothers 

paints & varnishes 



Quality Unsurpassed Since 1870 



Compliments of 

J. W. PURKEY & SONS 



"Where Bereans Save" 



BEREA, KENTUCKY 



Nu-Way 
Cleaners 




Where the Nation Shops and Saves 
Over 1600 Stores 

J. C. PENNY COMPANY 

Richmond, Kentucky 



Compliments of FROM 

DORIS PIATT A BOOSTER OF 

SHOP CLEAN SPORTS 



Compliments of 

LERMAN BROS. 

"KNOWN FOR BETTER VALUES" 
Richmond, Kentucky 



TO OUR MILLIONS OF VALUED CUSTOMERS 

TYPEWRITERS are available for rental to anyone. 

MAINTENANCE SERVICE, from coast to coast in 366 cities is in complete 
and efficient operation for all makes of typewriters. 

RIBBONS, CARBON ROLLS AND CARBON PAPER— Complete lines are 
available for all makes of machines. 



UNDERWOOD ELLIOTT FISHER COMPANY 

One Park Avenue, New York City 1 6, N. Y. 

In war production on U. S. Carbines, Caliber .30 M-l — Airplane Instruments 
— Gun Parts — Ammunition Components — Fuses — Primers — and Miscel- 
laneous Items. 




"The Paniplus Company" 



Compliment's of 



Central Service Station 



Compliments of Pat's Place 



%WADSWORTlf|b - 1 ECTRlcMFCfelNC 

Manufacturers of 

SAFETY SWITCHES 

DISTRIBUTION PANELS 

ELECTRIC TIME SWITCHES 



BROCK-MCVEY CO. 
Incorporated 

Distributors of 
Plumbing, Heating and Tinners' Supplies 

Vine and Southeastern Streets 
Lexington, Ky. 



Best Wishes for the Class of 1944 



DAVIDSON BROTHERS AND CO. 



Berea, Kentucky 




MEEKS MOTOR FREIGHT 
Incorporated 



Compliments 

of 



"Here Comes Meeks" 



THE E. T. SLIDER COMPANY 



722-724 National Avenue 



Lexington, Kentucky 



Louisville 
Kentucky 




LOOMS & LOOM PARTS 

LINEN & COTTON YARNS 

COTTON CARPET WARP 

KRINWOOL RUG FILLER 

TINSEL 

New & used Reeds — Heddles 

Harness Frames etc. 

Books on Hand Weaving 

HUGHES FAWCETT, INC. 

Hand Loom Weaving Dept. 

1 1 5 Franklin St. 

New York, 13, N. Y. 



YARNS 
For KNITTING and WEAVING 

for thirty-five years 

Ask for Sample Cards 

CLIVEDEN YARN CO. 

Dept. X 
711 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE NEW 
FISHERIES COMPANY 

FISH 

SEA FOODS 

OYSTERS 

324 325 

W. Sixth Street 
Cincinnati, Ohio 




GREETINGS 

TO YOU 

WHO MAKE THOSE 

DELICIOUS CAKES 

AT 

BEREA COLLEGE 



WE HOPE 

KOTTEN CAKE MACHINERY 

HAS BEEN HELPFUL 

KOTTEN MACHINE CO., INC. 

BUILDERS OF FINE 

CAKE BAKERY MACHINERY 

170-34th St. BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Compliments 
Of 

CODELL CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, inc. 

Winchester, Kentucky 

Heavy Construction 
Specialists 

J. C. Codell W - J " Moore 

J. C. Codell, Jr. M - T - Code " 

J. Scott Talbott H. K. McCormick 









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